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Some pebbles


Yuri

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Thanks for the comments.

The stone is actually quite soft, you can scratch it wit ordinary tool steel. They are some 3/4 or even smaller in real life, the photo makes them bigger.

By the way, I cheated with the finish. From the sandpapers and polishing wheel the stone still looked sort of gray and dusty, so I immersed them in linseed oil. That gave them the black look. (The inlays were done afterwards, as ivory gets grubby-looking if oiled.)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for the comments.

The stone is actually quite soft, you can scratch it wit ordinary tool steel. They are some 3/4 or even smaller in real life, the photo makes them bigger.

By the way, I cheated with the finish. From the sandpapers and polishing wheel the stone still looked sort of gray and dusty, so I immersed them in linseed oil. That gave them the black look. (The inlays were done afterwards, as ivory gets grubby-looking if oiled.)

 

Greetings from Whakatane... I also use pebbles from the beach for carving. The stone I use is "very" similar to yours, but is called Argillite. Which is a sedimentary fossilised. The darker the colour the older the fossilisation. Can be from 100 to 300 million years. My stones are also fairly soft, in the 3.5-4 (whatevers) in regard to diamond. Around or slightly softer than marble. A beautiful stone to carve, in fact the early Maori used it often, getting their stone from the Nelson area. Nice carving. I'm only a learner so will put some on show when I feel compatible with you folks...Colin

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Hi Yuri,

 

I just noticed this post today when browsing - these are lovely little carvings! I'm sure you are right on as to Basalt - we find nice little basalt pebbles on the Oregon coast here in the Pacific Northwest U.S. Again - very nice work -thankyou!

Blessings,

Magnus

P.S.

Do you have a photo of the hole you drilled for the cord?

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Do you have a photo of the hole you drilled for the cord?

Er, no, I don't. And I can't take one, as the pieces are gone, from a gallery. The holes are one down, from the highest point of the given carving, meeting another one, from a few mms, maybe some 10-12 or so, drilled from the back. So the hole is not a straight one. A bit like the letter L, but tilt the foot about 45 degrees down. then smooth the bend with a bit of a diamond burr, so it doesn't cut the cord.

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