Jump to content

Medal cont.


Dick Bonham

Recommended Posts

Janel had asked about the techniques I use to create some of my pieces. I thought a tutorial on the process would be a help to someone working in metal. The finished piece shown here is a box medal created for the 2002 Fédération Internationale de la Médaille show in Paris. The piece is four inches in diameter and the two pieces are threaded so the medal can be opened. The first step is to do several drawings of the design. I then do a pen and ink rendering the exact size of the final medal. I also draw the different pieces that will be cut out and brazed together. I do a measured drawing and have the basic form turned at a local machine shop. My skills with machine tools are non existent.

 

If anyone is interested in having their work shown in some wonderful venues we would love to have new members join AMSA the American Medallic Sculpture Association. This association is for people who create medals. Medals no longer have to be something that looks like a coin with a portrait on one side. Japanese tsuba would be considered a medal by today’s standards. Pieces can be carved, cast, struck, fabricated and molded. They are basically a small sculpture that can be held in ones hand. A bass relief netsuke would be considered a medal. We have shows in many major museums and galleries worldwide. Check out the AMSA website. www.amsamedals.org

post-15-1106769506_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim,

The brazing paste seems to hold the piece in place when the flow temperature is reached. I have been able to braze as many as a dozen pieces together before changing to silver solder. Some of the "GI Joe" prototypes might have as many as a hundred parts asembled in layers. A sight on a machine gun alone might have a dozen tiny parts. I can braze them one at a time at the same temperature without anything moving. If I tried to do that with just hard silver solder they would be sliding all over the place. It is Rio Grande Brass Paste Solder part number 503053. I have posted a picture of a "GI Joe" prototype so you can see how complex the pieces are. The other side is also multi-layered.

Dick

post-15-1106770949_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I then set the piece in pitch so it can be worked from the front and rear to establish the proper form. The entire hummingbird could be created in this manner from a single flat piece of metal using many different shapes of chasing tools and chisels. Jim Kelso did a tutorial on creating a frog in this manner on the Knifemakers' Forum. The next piece I do will be done in that manner.

post-15-1106766081_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A patina was applied to the medal using Jax solutions which create great browns to black colors on brass, bronze and copper. The Jax green solution works very well for the leaves. They also have a solution that deposits copper on steel and silver on copper alloys.

Japanese alloys, gold and fine silver can be used to get a greater variety of colors.

post-15-1106768414_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...