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Has anyone ever carved there Mayan stones?


chris-c

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Hi All,

 

I was just wondering if anyone here has ever heard of, or carved any of these stones I have from Central America.

 

There is a couple different types of Mayan Jasper from Guatemala, lightning stone from Honduras around the Ruins of Copan, Petrified wood from Nicaragua, and another kind of stone I'm actually not sure exactly what it is, as it was only labeled with an "M", maybe "marble" or something similar, I dunno, but it's pretty.

 

I just don't know if they are a recognized carving stone, if they are in demand, or if anyone has any experience or suggestions for carving these stones or not, so I just thought I'd ask!

 

Chris ;)

 

Here are a few pics:

 

Mayan Jasper from Guatemala:

Mayan-Jasper-from-Guatemala-2.jpg

Mayan-Jasper-from-Guatemala-3.jpg

Mayan-Jasper-from-Guatemala-6.jpg

Mayan-Jasper-from-Guatemala-8.jpg

Mayan-Jasper-from-Guatemala-4.jpg

 

Below, lightning stone from Honduras

lightning-stone-from-Honduras-1.jpg

 

The below stone is unknown, only was labeled with "M":

Mayan-Jasper-from-Guatemala-1.jpg

Mayan-Jasper-from-Guatemala-7.jpg

 

Nicaragua Petrified wood

Nicaragua-Petrified-wood-1.jpg

Nicaragua-Petrified-wood-2.jpg

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Chris,

Any stone that is not cracky is good for carving, the main thing is that the final piece has to be pleasing to the eye no matter what material it is msde from.

 

All my best ....... Danny

 

 

Thanks Danny,

 

I figure since they are in slab form, they will be good for carving things like pendants and things like that.

 

I have a few "chunks" of green and black jade, but I'm saving those jadeite for when I get good with the jade ;)

 

One of the reasons that I posted this material was simply because I have never been able to find the same material anywhere online, and I have not yet spoken to anyone who has ever seen it, so I thought I'd see if anyone in here has seen it, being the very well versed people that you all are in the carving scene, and most likely, you are all very familiar with alot more materials than I am, as mostly, I am most familiar wit "gem" material, having studied gemology for many years, and NOT "GEOLOGY" which is not apparent to me just how amazingly different the 2 disciplines really are!

 

There are SO many minerals that end in "ite" I just cannot keep up with them!

 

Thanks for your advise!

 

Chris ;)

 

Ps, I'm gonna build my own "Foredom" type device with a Baldor permanent magnet brush motor that I have that is perfect for the job, and a motor controller I have that is sitting there new in the box waiting for me to do something with it!

 

I have a Mastercraft flex shaft that I broke off at the dremel tool some time ago that I'm gonna try to interface with the motor shaft, and if that all works, I'll have a very high torque, 0-1725 RPM easily and precision speed controlled hand piece that will work great until I can invest in a "real" fordom. It will be better than the existing dremel tools because of the motor and controller, but the hand-piece will still be crappy and will still vibrate violently like those always do, not good when i already need surgery for carpel tunnel in that hand!

 

Even if I could interface a "real" Foredom flex shaft to that motor and controller it would be awesome, as the motor is every bit as good as the one Foredom supplied i think!

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Hi,

 

My comment is not necessarily on the topic of ID for the materials, but the mention of hand-piece vibration and carpel tunnel symptoms caused me to want to ask a question. Are some stone carving set-ups made with a fixed position rotating tool (cannot think of the right words this morning)? This would allow both hands to hold and turn the stone as necessary and not cause the sorts of stresses that happen with the vibration of the hand-piece.

 

For example, a hint of the set-up used by TCP member andrew s . His web site jadefiend.com home page has a better image of how he holds the jade while carving.

 

I switched to an NSK micro-grinder (many posts in the archives about various machines like this one) that has the motor in the hand-piece with a coiled electric cord. Such a set-up reduces the vibration considerably, thus the wear and tear on the hand is reduced, and is much more controllable. I have yet to try mounting it like andrew s, I do not know if this method is used by those of us who carve wood.

 

Janel

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Chris,

If you would like to use the motor and control that you mention you might want to purchase a Foredom Flexade in the image below 23.00 in neoprene no handpiece included.

 

I have also put an image of the bench lathe that I have been using for cleaning and roughing of fire agate and opal at my carving bench, I think I posted an image of my own setup some time ago but had no luck finding the post with the search. Anyway I think the bench lathe is great as it allows the use of both hands plus it has a built in speed control.

 

Hope this is of some help ..... All my best ........ Danny

post-2604-1293817836.jpg

post-2604-1293817852.jpg

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Hi,

 

My comment is not necessarily on the topic of ID for the materials, but the mention of hand-piece vibration and carpel tunnel symptoms caused me to want to ask a question. Are some stone carving set-ups made with a fixed position rotating tool (cannot think of the right words this morning)? This would allow both hands to hold and turn the stone as necessary and not cause the sorts of stresses that happen with the vibration of the hand-piece.

 

For example, a hint of the set-up used by TCP member andrew s . His web site jadefiend.com home page has a better image of how he holds the jade while carving.

 

I switched to an NSK micro-grinder (many posts in the archives about various machines like this one) that has the motor in the hand-piece with a coiled electric cord. Such a set-up reduces the vibration considerably, thus the wear and tear on the hand is reduced, and is much more controllable. I have yet to try mounting it like andrew s, I do not know if this method is used by those of us who carve wood.

 

Janel

 

Hi Janel,

Thanks for your reply, and also your concern!

 

I'm guessing that you are talking about a system like this one, only with a bit on the end instead of a buffing mandrel:

 

Link to Foredom bench mandrel

 

I have had this carpel tunnel for a long time actually, I had it in both hands, but about 15 or more years ago now I had the right hand surgery done, (and I'm left handed by the way) but it really didn't seem to do anything to help, the only reason I agreed to have it done is because I ruptured the tendon in that same hand shoveling snow (Darn Canadian winters!) and had no choice, so they "fixed" everything.

 

Not to get into all this stuff, but I need several surgeries for several things, I'm disabled with a severe chronic pain syndrome, arthritis, need a hip replacement ect, and I also have Renaud's disease in my hands, meaning there is barely any circulation going into my hands to begin with, so they get numb anyhow...lol. On top of that, because of a neurological condition, my hands shake badly on and off, and I've lost alot of the dexterity and use of my hands, to the point where I can't even "write" anymore, have to print now.

 

So carving really IS therapy for me, and if there is anything I can do to lessen the discomfort of doing it, and improving my results, I'm ALL for it!

 

It's something I've been doing on and off for a very long time now, but never developed my full potential in it, like most other things in life...LOL

 

I've actually looked at these systems your talking about, but for some reason, I just cannot seem to wrap my brain around how to use them, it just doesn't make "sense" to me in my mind about how I could possibly get to all the spots I need to with the bit, while still being able to "see" the bit making contact with the stone, it seems that I would have to turn it in such a way that I would hit "blind spots", and this is probably because of the way I know I have to hold the carving in a weird way that makes sense to me, due to my "condition", know what I mean??

 

I tried carving with a small 4" sintered diamond saw blade hanging down from a mounted bearing shaft like alot of those guys in Brazil do it, and it just didn't "feel" right to me, so that is my only experience with a fixed mandrel type system where you move the stone, and not the bit, and I don't think I liked it much, but maybe I just needed to get used to it? I dunno.

 

I was just about to get into a bunch of "Foredom" questions, but I thin it's best that i don't mess up this thread, and start a new one specific to my Foredom questions! Please look for the new thread I'm about to post if you can help me out with that, thanks ;)

 

Thanks also for referring me to the webpage that you did, it looks very interesting!

 

I've seen those NSK micro-grinders, and wondered about them, so I'm glad to hear from someone who uses them and approves. When I seen them, i immediately thought of Danny's comments about the Dremel tools not having enough torque, and thought that those might be similar, and not powerful enough. I guess it all depends on what you carve!

 

Thanks again for your advise, I'm not sure if I could "adapt" to one of those that you suggested, too bad I could not try one out for awhile and see if it is better!

 

Take care!

 

Chris ;)

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Chris,

If you would like to use the motor and control that you mention you might want to purchase a Foredom Flexade in the image below 23.00 in neoprene no handpiece included.

 

I have also put an image of the bench lathe that I have been using for cleaning and roughing of fire agate and opal at my carving bench, I think I posted an image of my own setup some time ago but had no luck finding the post with the search. Anyway I think the bench lathe is great as it allows the use of both hands plus it has a built in speed control.

 

Hope this is of some help ..... All my best ........ Danny

 

Hi Danny, sorry I missed your post, we were obviously posting at the same time, haha.

 

Thanks for thinking of me Danny, and trying to put together a solution for me, i appreciate that!

 

I think I spoke too soon however about my plan, as the motor controller I had in mind for some odd reason does not control that good Baldor motor properly, it's a mystery, probably because it's a cheap crappy controller, one of those "router controllers" you see often on ebay for like $20 bucks or so.

 

I have a "proper" motor controller that would work great, but unfortunately, that one is allocated to be used with the faceting machine I'm currently building also, as it needs a high quality controller like that one to run the powerful motor I have mounted in it, and precise speeds are really important when faceting, so I can't sacrifice it for the flex shaft idea, bummer.

 

Sorry Danny also for not remembering that YOU sell lapidary supplies, DUH...LOL. As mentioned, i have memory issues, and sometimes it embarrasses me a bit when I forget something so obvious, I should have known to check your page first, sorry for that.

 

It is kinda funny however how I just posted a link for the very same motor that you did at the same time, great minds think alike you know!

 

So, I think I'm faced with my initial plan, to purchase a REAL Foredom unit, , I've posted a new thread pertaining to that here to not mix everything all up and to try to keep the threads organized, sorry to jump all over the place, if you think my organization here is bad, you should see my sock drawer...LOL

 

Link to Foredom thread

 

We should continue discussing the Foredom there, sorry for the inconvenience and confusion I've caused with the threads in an attempt to organize them!

 

(Meet you there?)

Chris ;)

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