Jump to content

Emerging cicada


Guest DFogg

Recommended Posts

Guest ford hallam

That "face" certainly rings a bell ( no not Quasimodo ), hmmm who could I be thinking of? :D

 

I must agree with Donn in that it does remind one of the work or H R Giger, nothing new under the sun!? :)

 

Thanks Don, for a lovely start to my day, it can only get better, hmmm.... Perhaps not, I`ve got to have a shave, aargh! that face , again.

 

Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

[

the pear wood piece I'm on at the moment.....I feel reassured that I haven't gone too far from nature with it now :)  :D  :) ...perhaps?...we'll see.

 

will we? i hope so, don`t be shy, you show me yours and I might ( coy smily ) show you mine.

 

Ford B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeff, I shot it with a Nikon 5700.

 

There were about 10 kagillion of them in my backyard a few years ago, you could barely carry on a conversation for the noise. This summer it is like crickets. Despite the numbers, it is hard to find them unless you are an entomologist. I got lucky with this one, he was parked eye height on a tree on the path to my shop, some hunter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right after you posted the picture, Will brought me a cicada which was sitting on something out by the rabbitry in plain sight! After all of the years I've lived in the country... I"ve never spotted one myself yet! I have given her a thorough look over and am amazed at the strange beauty this creature is. Your picture reveals the look of newness to the just emerged.

 

Janle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are three rubies on the top of its head that are brilliant red. Also, where ever I moved around him the eye followed me, like 270 degrees. Amazing creatures.

 

post-1-1123681093.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did the eye really move or is it the reflective/refractive nature of that sort of eye to have your eye perceive movement? Just curious! I see a little dark area...was it that which moved? I did not know the dots were ruby red! The dried specimines given to me were not colored anymore. Do you know what they are used for?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Don,

 

Nice to know that we both share the same camera. Thanks.

 

It was funny, I remember when I was a child, you would hear them every year, some years more than others. Once in a while we would find a cast-off skin and place these on our shirts and walk around with them on and notice people's reactions.

 

When the swarm emerged 2 years ago, I was at my niece’s first communion in Princeton, NJ and had the rest of my family (brothers and sister) there. The cicadas were flying all over the place. They looked like some of those bat pictures when they emerge from their darkened areas after dusk and hordes were flying around. Anyway, my goofy brother starts grabbing these cicadas (actually just pulling them off his suit as they were flying all over) and he starts to throw them on everyone. As stern look from my Dad and a stare/comment from me and he quit. :(

 

Thanks,

 

Jeff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The dark spot in the bulging eyes were what followed me.

Sorry this one is a little out of focus, but you can see the eye in a different place in this shot.

 

32902019_9e30321c2f_o.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wish I could see a live eye. I think that the openings in the eye have some depth, and the opening aimed directly at the lense of the camera has a straight line into the eye, and the other openings are aimed in other directions. Imagine short and narrow straws stuck into a pingpong ball aimed at a spot on the back side of the ball, each straw focusing its view onto a particular area in the spot on the back side of the ball. I won't go on with the analogy, but sometimes I think that I might have been an entomologist in a different life. I like to figure things out about the critters I find. Learning is fun!

 

Thanks for the amazing picture! Do you still have the cicada? The one I have has dark eyes, but I will go look at it with a magnifier.

 

ZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZRRRRRRRrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Google is so much fun! The answer is, the cicada has compound eyes. Made up of many ommatidia (tightly grouped haxagonal facets with corneal lenses that are the light gathering and sensing organs of an insect) which function as individual visual receptors. Each ommatidium is pointed at just a single area in space and contributes information about only one small area in the field of view. The more ommatidia the sharper the vision.

 

It appears that the cicada has a relative few ommatidia compared to dragonflies for instance. The cicada does not depend on accuracy to survive as does the dragonfly.

 

I think that the sense of being watched by the cicada eye is a result of the ommatidium cell depth, in slight shadow, which is revealed as the viewer peers into that cell which is oriented to the viewer. Since there are relatively few cells to the cicada eye, individual cells may seem to be watching the viewer.

 

This is something I have pondered for years, but never took the time to learn more about it. Dragon fly eyes seem to do the same thing, but with less distinct points of darkness.

 

Thanks for the opportunity to learn something other than carving techniques. Sorry if the knowledge takes the mystery out if it, though the next time you look into the many eyes of an insect, the mystery is still there!

 

ommatidia.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...