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burning machine pyrography


b_art79

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Bart:

 

I have a Colwood SuperPro and some ivory, so I thought I'd give it a try and see what happened.

 

The Colwood has a detail side or a heavy duty side. I used the detail side with a liner type tip and had to turn it up to 5 to mark lines in the ivory. I works, but slowly. I didn't turn it up higher because I didn't want to smell the stink. It makes lines and with the smaller tip I think you could have alot of control.

 

This is the type of woodburner I used http://www.texaswoodcarvers.com/Tool_Catal...d_Burners_1.htm.

 

This is the type of tip I used http://www.texaswoodcarvers.com/Tool_Catal...d_Burners_3.htm. The tip number is 1220506. If you went with the tip number 1220513 you could do alot smaller work.

 

I use this woodburner to carve wax; I set the unit on detail and set it at 1. I used to do a little woodburning, and it worked great for that.

 

Hopes this helps.

 

Debbie K

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Bart:

 

There's more than one maker of these sort of pens http://www.woodcraft.com/Search2/Search.as...dburning%20pens

 

Just look for one that has a controller for the temperature.

 

I know that there are several experienced woodburners on this site. I was hoping that someone with more information than me would respond, maybe they will. I just can't say that the other woodburners are capable of burning ivory. I hope you're able to find one a little closer to home.

 

Debbie K

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Might it be possible to ask the companies that make the tools at what temperature the pen tips are when on the different settings? With experience for burning different materials, and knowledge of the temperature ranges of the settings, one might be able make an educated guess perhaps?

 

I don't use this technology with my work, so I can only ask questions.

 

Janel

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  • 3 months later...

I have a Colwood Super Pro as well, with the detail and heavy duty sides. I use it quite a bit for detailed wood burning, and a bit of pyrography. I have used it for 'burning' antler, but it is murder on the tips. Heat needs to be turned up quite a bit ... so I use the heavy duty side (this side has gauge wire , so more current gets to the tip, at a lower dial setting). It's a fine line, on most antler .. you turn the dial up enough to get enough 'heat' out of the tip (this setting varies widely, depending on which tip you use), and often need to have it turned up so high that the tip can get red hot, which apparently softens the metal, and wears out much faster. It requires much more sharpening and dressing of the tips. I only use it for accent .. darken in recesses, or add a darker color for contrast, etc. This still keeps the end result 'natural', rather than painting, etc. Of course, I'm not sure how 'natural', carving with steel tools, or rotary carvers, then burning with electric tools is .... :-)

 

Here are a few examples:

 

Normal basswood burning I do:

Basswood burn

 

Eagle on elk crown, without burning

After accenting with burning

The whole piece

 

Another elk crown 'before'

After

 

Elk crown using burning for contrast

Side view - to show relief and burning for contrast detail

 

Of course there's quite a variety in antler hardness. Softer antlers might work pretty well. I have not tried working with horn, although I would like to try buffalo horn, and a few others. The last time I worked with (cow) horn was back in the 70's for a pair of black powder horns. I should probably pull them out and finish them now! LOL

 

I don't know as I would burn a whole image with wood burning technique ... I would be more likely to try scrimshaw and ink.

 

I hope this helps!

 

Dennis

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Might it be possible to ask the companies that make the tools at what temperature the pen tips are when on the different settings? With experience for burning different materials, and knowledge of the temperature ranges of the settings, one might be able make an educated guess perhaps?

 

HI, Janel ....

This would be difficult for a few reasons, I think ....

1) no matter what number you put on the 'dial', the temperature would be different from one tip design to the next. And I would expect, from one tip to another even with the same design.

2) It would be tough to figure out when to take the measurement. If you put a tip on '3', for example, with tip 'XZ', and just let it sit at rest, I think the temperature would continue to rise, and not remain consistent. Indeed, if I leave a tip set at almost any dial setting, it is liable to get to hot, if I am not actively using the tip. I believe some pyrography machines have different circuity to attempt to deliver consistent current to the tip .. depending on how it is used, or what it is used on. These might be more consistent, and could give better 'standing tool' temperature readings you are asking about.

 

But ... your statement : "With experience for burning different materials, and knowledge of the temperature ranges of the settings, one might be able make an educated guess perhaps? " is true, but I think from a working standpoint, you could probably leave out the "and knowledge of the temperature ranges of the settings," It doesn't take long to get a feel for what tip to use when, at what dial setting .. for what material. ... probably the same with pretty much any tool, I guess. Just dive in! :-)

 

Cheers,

 

Dennis

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Hi Dennis,

 

I wonder if it might be helpful for the less experienced users of pyrography with their work might find a scrap of the same material to be helpful in seeing how the tip is working at any given moment before starting up?

 

Janel

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Hi Dennis,

 

I wonder if it might be helpful for the less experienced users of pyrography with their work might find a scrap of the same material to be helpful in seeing how the tip is working at any given moment before starting up?

 

Janel

 

Yes ...... it is a useful method for everyone! This would be especially helpful, when moving to a new piece of material. Different woods, certainly behave differently ... and it is the same with antler. Even pieces of antler from the same animal can change density from section to section.

 

In either case ... always start low on the dial (assuming that's 'low' temperature), and move up until you get the desired temp. One thing that changes the burning effect, is the speed you want to move the tip, and still get the desired amount of 'burn', be it light or dark, etc. Move too slow, and you burn too much, move to fast, and you're not doing anything but scratching your material. At least antler doesn't have significant 'grain' to it, like the growth rings in woods do!

 

I'm always looking for smaller tips and tools, to get increasing detail, and work with smaller materials. This doesn't work so well with antler and burning, however. Smaller tips heat up faster, but also 'burn up' faster. I have not tried pens that might allow me to use Xacto type knives, for very fine cuts. I use the company's smallest tips, and file and burnish to as fine a tip as I can.

 

When doing wood burning, I tend to use sharp tips for sharp detail, and I am cutting the wood, as much as burning. A sharp tip will allow you to cut through those growth rings, rather than float over them, reducing the 'wavy' look of some burns. That technique doesn't seem to work well on antler. Once the tip gets hot enough to effect a burn, it is also hot enough to soften, and dull too rapidly. I have pretty much just reserved myself to use it for reverse highlighting (using it to increase the appearance of depth, for example), or contrast. I have been disappointed in attempts to simply burn polished antler. I usually want cleaner, crisper lines than what I can accomplish with the burner.

 

I am much intrigued (and awed! ) by the grace, beauty, and lack of tool marks from Janel, and others here! I need more time to perfect my tool making .... and then the use of them!

 

Carve on .......,

Dennis

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