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Tree Frog And Baby Stick Bug


Robert Mayo

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Bob,

 

Thanks for the great photos. I am always amazed at the different textures and colors that are on tiny creatures such as your stick bug - natural netsuke.

 

In the summer it seems that I'm rescuing frogs from our swimming pool and toads from our dogs. The frogs are lean and colorful while the toads are pudgy and humorous.

 

Think I'll work up a pattern and start carving .

 

Thanks.

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Those are a couple of my favorite creatures! I have seen the tiny walking sticks in the grass that are unbelievably small. Simply amazing. Good photo, I must say!

 

Here are my studio mates and models. The tiny spring peeper is maybe 3/4" or about 2 cm or less in length. She is about one or two years old. The big 'gray tree frog' is perhaps eight or nine years old. It is quite interesting to watch these marvelous creatures as they age from the tight and green young frog-lets to these most senior ages.

 

Spring Peeper:

sp_peeper_w.jpg

 

Gray Tree Frog:

peeper_w.jpg

 

This gray tree frog is an older version of yours, Bob. I raise crickets to feed them.

 

Janel

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Hello Bob,

 

Wonderful photographs. I hope you won't mind some clarification of your identified stick bug. You are 50% correct that it is a bug (Order Hemiptera). But it is a member of the assassin bug family, Reduviidae. Walking sticks I believe are a member of the grasshopper and cricket order, Orthoptera. Assassin bugs are predators of other insects that they seize with the front pair of legs, pierce with their mouthparts and suck out the body juices. I am including a picture of a phasmid, I believe, that is closely related to walking sticks. Both your picture of the assassin bug and this phasmid show those spindly legs. One difference comes down to the mouthparts which I am sure everyone can appreciate is a bit difficult to do with a live insect and especially one so small. Anyway, you have a great picture with scale (finger included) that would make a great subject for a carving project.

post-2813-0-46015400-1299350541.jpg

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Hi Gary,

 

Thank you for the clarification. There are a variety of assassin bugs in Minnesota, though I have not photographed them. The walking sticks here are hard to find, and only appear to me by chance once a year or so. Are you an entomologist?

 

Janel

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I am fortunate to work at a natural history museum. While I am not a scientist I did major in biology in college and have an ongoing interest in natural history. There are many folks on staff at the museum that are willing to share what they know with me and it just rubs off.

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