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Guest DFogg

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For the past two months I have been getting ready for a show. I was on the show circuit for twenty years, but stopped a few years back due to family illness. It was like getting off the merry-go-round. Now after a break of several years, I have added a show to my schedule again.

 

I have a new perspective on this part of the business now. Conventional wisdom says that you have to do shows if only to keep your face in the public eye and I have to agree with this. Collectors like to talk with the artist face to face, get to know them, if only for that five minute show segment, it has a way of personalizing the work. Also, displaying the work gives the collector the opportunity to examine it up close. Photographs alone can not express the presence of a piece. Talking with your collectors is also a way of cementing relationships and assessing the market. Selling your work at shows is often not the most important benefit although when you live the artist's life and the hand is empty, the mouth does not get filled. Shows are much like advertising, where name recognition eventually leads to sales, but where expectations of direct sales should be minimized.

 

Those are some of the reasons that I used to convince myself to go through this punishing ordeal of long hours, no days off, high stress, belt tightening, and physical exhaustion. I hate shows, but have to admit I would never have pushed myself this hard without a deadline.

 

And so I trundle off to Thrusday to sleep in some strange hotel, eat fattening food, suffer sleep depravation and overstimulation. After months of virtual isolation from the world, I am going to put on uncomfortable clothes and talk to a river of complete strangers until I can no longer form words or complete sentences. They do not know that inside I am suppressing a panic attack at the sight of so many people, quelling stage fright and praying that the work I have done will be accepted. Ah, the creative life.

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Oh man, do I hear you. :unsure:

 

Once I am commited to a show I generally can make the best of it, but it seems harder and harder. I don't know if I should commiserate or encourage. I guess I'll do a little of both.

All those reasons you gave to go, apart from the actual sales are good, plus maybe (probably), actually almost certainly, you'll have some fun with your buddys. Also, it ain't bad getting a little first hand recognition juice for all the hard work you've done. I don't think you have to worry about yor work being accepted. Will we see it before you go?

 

Anyway have a great trip and don't gamble all your hard earned $ away! B)

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Don,

 

I hope you have a great show! Have some fun, you have earned it with all of the work you have done to be ready for it. Take time to laugh with some old friends and meet new ones.

 

Good thoughts coming your way while you are on your journey!

 

Janel

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  • 1 year later...

More than a year has gone by since this thread was begun. We've all been through a year of the show cycle and barrel towards more busy seasons. My husband and I await the determinations of various juries to see how our income potential prospects shape the seasons ahead.

 

How do we all differ when it comes to creativity and working, pressure and show preparation? Do some of us perform better under pressure of a deadline? Do some of us need clear and quiet months with room for exploration? Do some of us even do shows or instead, bring a collection to a client for first pick of the new work?

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