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Vera & metal box


Jim Kelso

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Hi Mike. Sorry I missed your post two days ago. Verawood (Bulnesia sarmienti) sometimes known as Palo Santo is a cousin of Lignum Vitae and is extremely heavy(does not float in water). It is filled with a very spicey, fragrant oil and resists glueing and finishing. It does have a very interesting grain and is quite pleasing flat-sawn. I have taken to sandblasting it to get a texture and enhance the grain. When freshly finished it is tan and turns green over a few days and exudes the oil which has to be brushed off or steel-wooled.

 

Perhaps not the best for detail carving, I am using it for box forms.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have one maidenhair fern in my shade garden, but it is not yet well established. Last winter was hard on the '04 transplants, this was among them from a perennial swap. I see it on my way to the studio. Our woods were grazed by sheep for a long while, so many native sweethearts are not present, but can be found in some places in the surrounding woods which belong to others.

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Hi Dick,

 

Thanks. It's 4% shakudo from Phillip Baldwin.

I started with it pretty thick(about .060" - 1.5mm) because I wanted to pierce it down fairly narrow around some of the stems and leave the thickness there. It's thinned way down at the edges of the leaves, so that it ended up pretty light and thin in general.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Dick. Yes it has the snail. I'm being somewhat secretive about showing the whole piece together until it's finished. Hope that's not annoying. :huh:

 

I patinated today and the copper came very red which I have never been able to get before. It's just the wrong context with the very green Vera wood. I'll try to change it tomorrow.

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Jim,

 

if you`re using the standard rokusho mix, which I assume you are, then the addition of a half teaspoon of vinegar ( does`nt have to be rice vinegar ) to about 3 pints should result in a more terracotta colour on your copper. A pinch of borax in the mix tends to help the development of a clearer red.

 

hope that is of some use,

 

Ford

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Guest ford hallam

Hi Jim,

 

it`s unlikely you`ll be able to significantly alter the colour at this point if it is a good deep tone. If you want an even, but different colour you`ll have to remove it. I`d be inclined to selectively remove the present patinae and create a somewhat varigated effect, leave traces of the deeper tone in the grooves, texture and deeper areas. This will help to articulate the carved surface and the variation in the patinae can add a certain richness.

 

Apologies Dick,

 

nothing to show at the mo`, :( off to the land of the falling yen tomorrow. :)

i`ll be all fired up and ready to "create" when I get back though :D

 

I`ll check in from Tokyo when I can. I have internet access in my ryokan but I`ll probably too busy sampling sushi, supping sake and practicing origami with geisha.

It`s a tough life but someone has got to live it :huh:

 

Ford

 

hmm, now where did I put my inflatable travel chopsticks?

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