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Mark Strom

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This is by no means a small panel...measuring 43" x 91" and is carved poplar. This commission came about as a direct result of my connection to The Carving Path forum. With Janel's permission I am posting this work and am grateful beyond words that my connection to this Forum gave me this opportunity.

 

The panel is for a Brain Injury ward at a hospital in Minnesota. It is designed to cue visual recognition of familiar landmarks, stimulate the brain through the touch of the various textures and to stimulate through colors.

 

This was a very complex carving done mainly with a 3/4" flat chisel. The intent was to give a folk art look and to present it in a simple manner. All the components are landmarks in the city and surrounding area. The deepest area is carved to a depth of 1 1/4" with over 90% of the work done with hand tools. There are 1123 windows each hand-painted and 64 shades of 6 colors. Total time to complete was 520 hours, 70 hours of which was painting.

 

Mark

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Hello Mark,

 

Thank you for posting the photo of this amazing panel of Saint Paul, Minnesota. I recognize most of the buildings and landmarks. What a wonderful contribution to the needs of those who will see and touch it. You have done a wonderful thing with this huge panel project.

 

I am thankful that the forum was a help in making this happen, for you, for the hospital and the patients.

 

Janel

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Thanks for the support! The panel is glued up from 1 3/4" and 3/4" thick boards stack glued to form 2 1/2" thick boards. The boards average about 6" wide. These were then joined to make sure they were flat and planed to 2 1/4" thick. The boards were then glued edge to edge to form the 48" x 96". A panel that large is tough to keep flat so the carving was done on the side that was bowed. The carved side drys faster and when hung the air flow behind the panel is less so that between all these factors the panel will straighten out to flat again.

 

The panel was hung using "J" molding used in the glass trade. You mount one on the back of the panel with the J upside down and the other piece mounted right side up on the wall. They interlock and if they are both lined up right the panel is really easy to handle...just lift and drop down. Then the panel is secured in place with 2 screws at the bottom of the panel and it is then locked in place.

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