Jump to content

Knife With Carved Bone Handle


John S.

Recommended Posts

I started with an edger blade, which I cut into the shape I wanted, and ground it down to shape. I cut the grips from a cow femur, ground them down till they were flat, and epoxied them on, and let it sit overnight. The following day I ground them down to match the tang, and carved the celtic knot pattern into it.

 

It's a bit rough, but I don't mind that. It'll be for personal use. I'll be making at least one more, as I have enough steel left for another. The next one, I'm going to make wooden grips for it. Getting the bone flat enough to glue to the steel was a tremendous pain.

post-3017-0-30297600-1316050129.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi John,

 

Which steel did you use? It that your first knife?

 

For getting the bone flat, you can sand it by sticking your paper directly on a table (or flat piece of wood) and then apply pressure on your bone and draw "8", moving it with your hand. This will help you to get it as flat as possible and don't create these damn rounded corners.

 

Nice shape and carving by the way... it remembers me my first carving which was quite the samebiggrin.gif.

 

Cheers,

 

Thomas

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The steel is an edger blade. It's just a flat rectangle of steel, with a hole in the center. Mine was 7.5" long, maybe 3" wide, and maybe an eighth of an inch thick.

 

It's not my first carving (I've posted others on the forums, in fact), but it was my first Celtic knot, and the first time I've ever carved a pattern into a piece of bone. Normally I carve pendants from bone, but they tend to be smooth, organic sort of shapes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not my first carving (I've posted others on the forums, in fact), but it was my first Celtic knot, and the first time I've ever carved a pattern into a piece of bone.

 

Yep I know, and I like your designs, very smooth and fluids.

 

I am a bit afraid that your edger would be a bit too soft. Did you try to temper a small sample, just to check if t was a good steel?

 

I love celtic designs and that's a nice knife you did!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The steel is quite rigid. It took an edge well, and I've been using it the last couple days for everything I need a knife for, and the edge is holding up so far. I didn't temper it at all, as I don't have the equipment to do so. I just made sure I didn't remove the temper that was already there.

 

I've started another one. The blade is ground down, and the handle is glued to it. Dunno when I'll have time to carve the grips down, but I plan on doing something similar, with a pattern in both sides, though I'm not sure what sort of pattern yet. This time around, I'm using red oak for the grips, and not bone. Much easier to deal with.

 

Thanks for the compliments and the feedback.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know about the Red oak but I did try regular french oak once. It tends to tear more than cut finely, hope your tools are sharpened!

 

Cheers,

 

Thomas

 

Yeah, I noticed when I was cutting it, bits would splinter and tear. I think I might whittle it down with my pocket knife rather than my rotary tool. I'll experiment on the left over pieces. I'll get it worked out one way or the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...