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Carved Trefoil Knot


Malcolm

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Although I have been a forum member for quite a few years, I never uploaded any images of my carvings. I made this trefoil around 1993. It is carved plaster with acrylic, and around 1.75 inches in diameter. This photo was made today, with a camera I borrowed from my daughter, and the image is not very good because I never used a digital camera before.

 

Janel, in preview this image appears to be above your recommended guidelines in size. I would reduce it if I knew how. Sorry, but I am still in the process of adjusting to the digital age.

 

Malcolm Schosha

 

post-2-0-67410900-1317165788.jpg

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Hello Malcolm,

 

Thank you for figuring out how to share your photo with us. I fixed the size for you, and thank you for being conscientious about the guidelines.

 

The piece is actually very small, and in good condition for being made of plaster. I find myself wondering what plaster is like to carve.

 

Are you carving now?

 

Janel

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Thanks for fixing the image size, Janel. Your help is much appreciated.

 

Plaster will take a lot of detail if it is mixed well, and carved with a light touch. But plaster always needs some sort of finish. I always seal the surface with at least two thin coats of shellac, and sometimes that alone seems enough. Otherwise, I put on a painted finish with an acrylic, or I put on gold leaf...but in either case that is over the shellac.

 

Right now I am carving two pieces in a terracotta clay. Either leather hard, or bone dry, clay can be carved, as you know. I am very fond of terracotta, and really like the feel of the fired material, but am not sure I will pursue it further. Although it is as easy, or more easy, to handle than porcelain, it still can break more easily then plaster when being carved. Also, since I stopped making pottery years ago, and live in a Brooklyn apartment, there is no place to put a kiln with all the heat and fumes that a firing produces.

 

Malcolm

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You make a good point about the fumes that are created by firings, and not used in an apartment. There are art or pottery centers in many major cities, and I believe there is a thriving community of potters in Brooklyn ( I know one of them ). Have you investigated the possibility of using the kiln space of a community pottery class for firing?

 

Janel

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I was at one time a member of the Clay Art Center, in Port Chester, NY. That goes back to a time when Elsbeth Woody was still there. I liked it being a coop, and it was a good place to work. But I am not sure there is anything quite like it in Brooklyn.

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