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Homage To Little Brown Bat


Jim Kelso

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This tray carved in a dense wood is an homage to the extremely distressed Little Brown Bat population in Vermont and New England who are suffering from "White-nose syndrome". The best guess is that they will become extinct in this area in 15-20 years. Our bug population was much increased this summer and I'm fairly certain that's connected to decreased bat numbers. I saw a bat catch a moth this summer with the backlight from the sunset off our porch.

 

The carving style is called shishiai-bori in Japan and all the carving is done below the polished surface. The moth is cut in katakiri-bori (Line engraving) style. The longest measurement is 100mm (about 4") and the deepest depth is a skosh more than 1mm. 2 inlayed teeth in bone and the eye is turned horn.

 

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Jim:

 

Beautiful work. I really like the look of the smooth contrasted with the bat.

 

I've always loved bats. When I was a kid, at twilight in suburban Houston at the edge of the city, they would fly down the street right at me, and at the last second veer away, just whispering past my face. It seemed as if they were playing a game, as they'd come back and do it again and again. I haven't seen a bat around here in at least 30 years, I don't know what happened to them.

 

What's white-nose syndrome and why is it fatal?

 

Debbie K

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Thank you Jim,

 

This is a sublime, visual story.

 

I, too, am concerned for the bat populations here, since there is the potential for the disease to spread.

 

Will and I were just wondering this weekend what you have been doing. Thank you for the update and photos.

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Thanks very much Kurt, Janel and He Li.

 

Kurt, the wing texture was achieved by first carving the contoured surfaces with a very shallow sweep gouge, to shape the surface and begin the texturing. This surface was gone over all again with a somewhat more curved sweep gouge to create the final texture. I'll add some more photos soon.

 

Jim

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Thanks very much Kurt, Janel and He Li.

 

Kurt, the wing texture was achieved by first carving the contoured surfaces with a very shallow sweep gouge, to shape the surface and begin the texturing. This surface was gone over all again with a somewhat more curved sweep gouge to create the final texture. I'll add some more photos soon.

 

Jim

 

 

Thank you Jim. Yes I see the curvatures and indentations, its just because, it looks so nice in your work. I tried something similar recently in stone, and the pattern simply did not come out even close to the elegance shown in your work.

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This tray carved in a dense wood is an homage to the extremely distressed Little Brown Bat population in Vermont and New England who are suffering from "White-nose syndrome". The best guess is that they will become extinct in this area in 15-20 years. Our bug population was much increased this summer and I'm fairly certain that's connected to decreased bat numbers. I saw a bat catch a moth this summer with the backlight from the sunset off our porch.

 

The carving style is called shishiai-bori in Japan and all the carving is done below the polished surface. The moth is cut in katakiri-bori (Line engraving) style. The longest measurement is 100mm (about 4") and the deepest depth is a skosh more than 1mm. 2 inlayed teeth in bone and the eye is turned horn.

 

post-4-0-45932700-1318251485.jpg

post-4-0-68728400-1318251516.jpg

Like everything you make no matter the material, excellent in both content & execution. Nature couldn't ask for a better spokesperson. Thank you for sharing & inspiring. Robert P.

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Jim the work is really elegant and delicate, a great representation of the delicate nature of the bat. As usual superb work.

 

I have been teaching carving classes and the beginning relief carving class is this style of carving. The designs can be carved with just three tools. Now I have a name for the style of work...I got the idea from carvings done on tombstones. Thank you for that information as well.

 

Mark

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