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Hobo With A Dobro


Ron  L.

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Thomas, Thank you for the nice comments. Sometimes I smooth out everything and treat it as if it were a blank canvas. This piece, I designed the piece around the metal that was there. The main hobo in the foreground was carved from the front leg of the buffalo that was on the reverse side of the coin, for example. These are basically the two methods I use. I call this the "cloud" method. That is, I sort of look at the raised metal on the coin like I would look at at the shape of a cloud and find a new composition within that space. On the "heads" side of the coin, there is a large head of an Indian which can be changed into different faces, or an infinite possibilities for new designs within. The buffalo is a bit limited that way as the buffalo is quite high relief, which means there is a low spot below the buffalo. I have to try to use what's there. Like the buffalo's leg turns into the main hobo in the foreground for example.

 

Pete, I use a Dino-Lite digital microscope for the imaging. It worked pretty well for this piece, and is especially good for close-ups although it's almost too much magnification. I have to really back it off a lot to get a silver dollar all the way into the frame, for example. It's really quick and easy to use though and has it's own led lighting system. It's also very small at about 4" in length and about 1-1/2" diameter. It came with a very small stand which I have to prop up with wood blocks to get it high enough to get a whole nickel in. Also, the image gets fuzzy around the edges. You can see a bit of this in the large photo above. I have to get a big enough image to start with, and crop out the fuzziness. This little camera came with the software. You can find them on the internet for around $360-$400 range.

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Pete, I use a Dino-Lite digital microscope for the imaging. It worked pretty well for this piece, and is especially good for close-ups although it's almost too much magnification. I have to really back it off a lot to get a silver dollar all the way into the frame, for example. It's really quick and easy to use though and has it's own led lighting system. It's also very small at about 4" in length and about 1-1/2" diameter. It came with a very small stand which I have to prop up with wood blocks to get it high enough to get a whole nickel in. Also, the image gets fuzzy around the edges. You can see a bit of this in the large photo above. I have to get a big enough image to start with, and crop out the fuzziness. This little camera came with the software. You can find them on the internet for around $360-$400 range.

 

Thanks Ron.

It sounds like a very simple, but effective, system to use. Currently I mess around with light boxes, lights, backings, settings, angles, lenses and the list goes on. I like to look at pictures but the process of taking them doesn't seem to be my cup of tea. I find it very time consuming and not really what I want to be doing.

If your system is just point and click with simple, quick and easy to learn software, then I'm seriously considering it.

I noticed on ebay the Dino-Lite brand ranging from $100-$500. I guess you get what you pay for but the promo pics for the entry level seemed quite good.

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