Jump to content

Dremel Tools Advice


Davy Tee

Recommended Posts

Hello all

 

I expect this has been asked a thousand times but i cant find any specific info on the forum (just me proberly)

 

I am getting a Dremel 300 with flexishaft with the intent to carve small animal figures and wood spirits in Lime and Silver Birch.

 

What Bits/Burrs do i need to carve these types of items from start to finish.

 

I am a complete novice so have no knowledge as of yet.

 

Thanks for your understanding.

 

Davy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Davy,

 

I cannot say if there are specific TCP posts about which bits or burrs our carvers might use. I began with regular bits that were offered at the hardware store, and then purchased some sets from carver's catalogs. Many of them I do not use at all, some find use occasionally and a few I use a lot. The choices may vary according to the size of the work you are doing and the nature of the materials being worked. That is all just general information, sorry. You will have to get a few bits/burrs and try them, and then go from there as your needs dictate.

 

I cringed when you wrote from start to finish. Please learn to finish your work with hand tools so that straight lines are straight, planes are flat or smooth, crevices are clean and areas of form that meet offer a convincing look. Using power tools is just the beginning of the process, and if they are the end of the process, most pieces look unfinished (to me).

 

Small files, jewelers files are one good step you might use after the power tool, then various knives and scrapers (of which there are many posts on TCP) to do the rest. Sanding may also be part of the process with increasingly smaller grit numbers. I try to sand less and use a very sharp scraper to smooth the surfaces on most of my pieces, but it all depends on what needs doing.

 

Is there a woodcarving store somewhere in your region? They might be able to talk with you about what other carvers like to use that might be in the store inventory.

 

Best wishes for your new journey!

 

Janel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Davy Dremel has a forum where you can get some info on dremel tools and bits. I have used several different bits to get my carving ready to finish with hand tools.

The bit to use will depend a lot on what type of wood and the hardness of it. I hace found that a lot of the dremel tools speed control is not the best. My advice to start, I would use the sanding drums with coarse and the work to fine. this will get you an idea of how to work the tool and removal of wood.

Let us know how things work out for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

P.S.

 

I realize that you are a novice carver, so I apologize for the strong response to finishing with the powered tool. I just wanted to let you know that powered tools have their limitations and their strengths. The power tools are just part of one's tool kit.

 

When using power tools, and when sanding either by power or by hand, I strongly encourage you to protect your lungs from the dusts that are created. Also, with power tools, there is a tendency for the tool to very quickly get caught and take a 360° zip around the small wood being carved, traveling over skin and finger nails. Ouch. It is part of my practice to use a reasonably study leather glove while doing the initial roughing out if the form.

 

It is also a very good idea to use eye protection of some form. I have a bench top dust collector with plexi-glass panels that form a three-sided box around the carving/dust-collecting area, so when something goes flying, it does not hit me in the face.

 

Hi Ed, Thank you for recommending the Dremel forum. It is good to see you here again.

 

Janel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Davy,

If I were going to start carving wood I would invest in solid carbide carving burrs, there are quite a few web sites that have solid carbide burrs that are geared toward tool and die makers, this said the cost is much less on this type site rather than the wood related sites. Did a quick search on tool and die carbide burrs and got many hits. Here is a link to one that has very fair prices for this type tool.

 

My main reason for saying solid carbide, on wood they will last almost forever.

 

http://www.atlascuttingtools.com/

 

All my best .......... Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Davy,

If I were going to start carving wood I would invest in solid carbide carving burrs, there are quite a few web sites that have solid carbide burrs that are geared toward tool and die makers, this said the cost is much less on this type site rather than the wood related sites. Did a quick search on tool and die carbide burrs and got many hits. Here is a link to one that has very fair prices for this type tool.

 

My main reason for saying solid carbide, on wood they will last almost forever.

 

http://www.atlascuttingtools.com/

 

All my best .......... Danny

 

 

Ok thanks for all advice folks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...
  • 1 month later...

I have used the Dremel tool for many years and eye protection is a priority. A form of dust collection / protection is also very important. That being said, check out shops or internet sites for carbide shapeing burrs, structured tooth type are agressive and good for fast shapeing. Stone or diamond grits are good for finishing smooth. While you can produce some very good looking pieces with rotary tools alone, it is still good to learn to use hand tools for situations where power tools would not give the proper finishing look. I have found that faster is better when it comes to carveing with rotary tools, just be aware that you can create some friction and burn your piece if you are not careful. I use a couple of air turbine rotary tools that go a 300,00 RPM and use special high speed bits. Talk about making a mistake in a hurry! As was said before, a small mistake in positioning can ruin a piece in a fraction of a second. A light touch is necessary, use the speed of the tool rather than increased pressure on the piece to remove maiterial. That also helps keep the mistakes to a minimum.

 

Have fun and good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 months later...

Just my 2 cents worth but for long term power carving go with the FOREDOM carver it comes with the flex shaft

and foot pedal. Excellent tool to work with plus you can get different collets for it and many types and sizes of burrs for it.

woodcraft.com has them and all of the accessories for them. The Dremel is ok for short term use but in my experience

their flex shafts are of poor quality they tend to break very easy and if you bend it the wrong way it'll stop working.

If you want a tool that will stay with you for a long time buy the good stuff and stay away from the junk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...