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A little carving, meaning not much.


Guest DFogg

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Thanks. Here is the overall and the part that I do know something about, the blade.

 

post-1-1125076936.jpg

 

 

My real passion for the past few years is the crystal transition between the hardened and unhardened sections of the blade. It is devilishly hard to photograph, but held in the right light, it is a wonder of formations, highlights and mystery. I have just begun to work with confidence in this area and don't have enough time left in this lifetime to gain mastery.

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Looks pretty masterful to me! I guess you can stay on the forum.

 

Seriously the whole knife exudes an integrated, powerful energy. The rather abstract hamon contrasts nicely with the restrained crisp carving.

 

How did you carve the outlines?

 

 

ok don!!!

i been waitn for an answer to that one for days:)

tell us howA!!!!!

checkering edger??

harley

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I used a V micro chisel and reground dental burrs for the cross grain cuts. It was harder than I thought it was going to be, but then I am new to this.

 

One of the interesting things I noticed under the microscope is how greasy the ebony is. There are pockets of black sap or something running with the grain. This wood was well seasoned, I got it from Gilmore and he had cut it ten years ago for a piano order. The cuts didn't look anything like I expected and were almost sticky. They slicked down shiny with a burners or the back of the chisel. Everything looks different under magnification, but this was a surprise.

 

I stablized the piece in Nelsenite.

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I am just starting to incorporate the microscope in the work and it is addictive. You can see the tool cutting. The drawbacks are that you don't have that big a field of view and everything looks huge until you pull away.

 

I did a handle this summer with interlaced leaves. I laid out a paper pattern and cut away the background under the scope. I spent a couple of days working before I took the paper off and I could barely see the outline of what I was doing. Now I switch back and forth from the optvisors to the microscope. It's obsessive.

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