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Janel

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Instructions-How To (briefly stated):

 

Start a new Topic in the Forum area of your choice.

 

Or in a topic already started, click the FASTREPLY button, scroll down a little to the empty reply box.

 

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Have a go at it and have a good time here!!

 

Janel

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post-133-1130692434.jpg Hi all, my name is Bobby Palmer and I have been looking over your shoulders this past month and learning, thank you all for sharing. So much talent, I perfer working small rather then large but because I am large small to me is from 2" to 8" pf cpurse eye sight helps and mine is fadding fast. Some of the things I make are utilirian such as 2-part Canes such as this Cane, Medusa in Boxwood. Thank you all for allowing me to watch and learn.
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Nice to meet you Bobby!

 

The cane handle is interesting, with quite a lot of carved elements. How do you attach the handle to the cane? I've always wondered, since the joint is a place that must receive much pressure when in use.

 

Janel

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Here is a good question.

 

When planning to use wood for the cane handle, with the 90° angle, which way do you orient the grain for the strength needed to keep from snapping the handle off when pressure is applied during use?

 

If the long grain runs along the handle, then does the verticle shaft have an inner support to keep it from snapping (along the shorter grain lines) when the angle of pressure changes?

 

Does my question make sense? I know when planning a netsuke or small sculpture, the orientation of the grain matters when something is thinner or vulnerable to pressure.

 

Janel

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that is a good question! Of course there are canes that exploit natural branched forms of antlers and wood, but when working with milled stock, which is preferred?

 

Maybe canes have reached the purely decorative point where strength isn't needed? :)

 

Stickmakers show yourselves :o Perhaps we need to start a stickmaking discussion thread?

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that is a good question!  Of course there are canes that exploit natural branched forms of antlers and wood, but when working with milled stock, which is preferred?

 

Maybe canes have reached the purely decorative point where strength isn't needed? B)

 

Stickmakers show yourselves :o Perhaps we need to start a stickmaking discussion thread?

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Thank you for you replys and questions. Yes strength is important for one never knows how the piece shall be used. My cane handles average 8 or 9 inches tall by 7 or 8 " for the cross member. I cut a round tendon in the upright 3/8" x 1" which is then inserted into the cross piece, after dry (glue) I pin the completed handle with a 1/8" dole to lock everything together. I use a brass connector similare to the one used in the construction of Pool Ques. I go to all this trouble so the handles can be used as Desk sculpture when not in use. Of course all of this is the result of being self taught. I tank you all for the warm welcome it is an honor to be allowed to watch and learn at the Carving Path. Thank You.

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post-155-1131394090.jpg

There must be a few of you just waiting for a little push to tell us about yourselves here!  Please use this encouragement to take the next step and share a little about yourselves  B) .

 

Janel

 

A great big sincere HELLO! from TURKIYE to all of the members of this great site,

 

I too am a "newbie on the block" who accidentally run into the Carving path site while seeking educational info on carving, engraving metal. I have been lurking through for a while, and I found out that there are a lot of members in this site for whose work I felt great respect, and thought I could learn more than I could contribute.

 

I have been carving, and engravig metal to make jevelry for my family and friends in a humble workbench I built in one of the rooms where I live. I earn my living by working as an Air Traffic Controller at The Ataturk Airport in Istanbul.

 

The picture attached is one of the pendants I have made for my wifes cousin, living in Florida. I hope you like it! Also all the critisizm are more then welcomed!

 

so in closing I must say,

 

Here's a "BIG THANK YOU" to all who started and contributed in the establishment of such a warm and elequent site, and to the people who are spending their efforts to keep it that way!!!

 

Have yourselves a wonderful day.

 

 

dagistanli

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Welcome Dagistanli! I'm very happy to see another metal carver. The pendant is very satisfying. Is that a traditional Turkish pattern?

 

Hi Jim,

 

Yes it's a mixture of traditional Turkish design and my own. The crescent and the star are traditional, and the form of the pendant is drived from the Ottoman architectural structures. The flowers and their placements are of my own.

 

I have been strolling through your site, and the things you've made show a high class quality of workmanship which I admire and congratulate. In knives section, No. 42 and 51 are superb, and under Unique Jewelry, No. 13 the ring is great. Also I loved all the items under Multiple Edition Jewelry.

 

Now, here is a question, are the different metals on your jewelry, like gold and SS, soldered one over the other or inlayed?

 

Well, I think we will have a lot of things to discuss on this forum.

 

Best Regards

 

ekrem.

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Hello Ekrem,

 

Thanks for your comments. In the Multiple Edition pieces, the metals are joined with pins that are soldered to the top piece. The pins go through a drilled hole and are peened from the back.

 

Sometimes I use this technique on the unique pieces, but will also use soldering and inlay depending on the situation. Inlayed piece in the Unique Jewelry section include 3,6,& 10.

 

Did you go to school to learn your art? How did you find the forum?

 

Cheers, Jim

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Hi Jim,

 

Thank you for sharing your experience regarding the techniques you have used to make those beautiful pieces of jewelry. It's greatly appreciated.

 

Regarding  the Inlayed piececes in the Unique Jewelry section 3,6,& 10, are all the different metal pieces inlayed? If so, on picture No.3, how did you inlay that piece of carved and gold shots (but the gold shots also look like you've made them by a suitable graining tool) of inlayed shakudo in to the copper base?

 

Well my father had a repair shop in Istanbul where he repaired antiques so that's where I got acquainted with some of the tools I use, and then I was privileged enough to have some bench jeweler friends from whom I learned and still learning a lot of techniques, also I've learned a lot of things from books, forums and most of all lots and lots of practice. Maybe you'll call that "self thought", because I never did go to school for my practice.

 

It was nice hearing from you again. Until the next time,

 

 

best Regards.

 

 

ekrem

 

Hello Ekrem,

 

Thanks for your comments. In the Multiple Edition pieces, the metals are joined with pins that are soldered to the top piece. The pins go through a drilled hole and are peened from the back.

 

Sometimes I use this technique on the unique pieces, but will also use soldering and inlay depending on the situation. Inlayed piece in the Unique Jewelry section include 3,6,& 10.

 

Did you go to school to learn your art? How did you find the forum?

 

Cheers,  Jim

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post-153-1131485818.jpg

 

 

Hi all, I thought it was about time I posted rather than just lurking. I am a jeweller from the UK although these days I spend a lot of my time wax carving, I wasn't quite sure for a bit if you would think that I fitted in here but I thought I would see.

I am a bit of a tool junkie, and cant seem to be able to resist having a go at making my own tools rather than buying them , I will see if I can take some photos to show. It took me about an hour to sort out this one to the right size , I hope!

Have to go and recover now,

Tim.

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"Regarding the Inlayed piececes in the Unique Jewelry section 3,6,& 10, are all the different metal pieces inlayed? If so, on picture No.3, how did you inlay that piece of carved and gold shots (but the gold shots also look like you've made them by a suitable graining tool) of inlayed shakudo in to the copper base?"

 

Hi Ekrem,

 

Yes, on those pieces all of the different metal bits are inlayed, except the one you mention(the gold grained one). I think it is pinned through the shakudo. I made that gold piece by punching the grains one at a time.

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Thank you, dagistanli for the warm welcome and the introduction to your carving!  Please feel welcome to join in with questions or answers or ideas with the rest of the forum members.

 

Janel

 

Hello Janel,

 

I've also seen your work, and they are absolutely beautiful. How long did it take you to learn to carve that well, and what steps did you follow to achieve it?

 

Best regards,

 

dagistanli

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Hi Jim,

I carved it as a sample when I got my microscope, a lot of the pieces I do are customers designs so I thought I should have somthing to show.

It is a copy of an art nouveau piece and would weigh about 60 grams in 18ct so I dont know if I will ever cast it.

I do make one off pieces in metal ,at the moment I am quite taken with some of the interesting surface textures you can get in shibuichi but xmas orders have to come first. (unless I get distracted!)

 

Tim.

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Welcome Dagistanli. I spent several months in Istanbul and really loved it. Glad you have joined us.

 

 

Hi Don,

 

It certainly is my pleasure to be able to join in with all the ladies and gentilmen of this distinguished group of artists. I say distinguished and I mean it, after I've seen some of the work you ladies and gentlemen have put out.

 

Those blades are superb! I am sure Turkiye was pleased to have such an artist as yourself over here, and I wished I had the chance to meet you then.

 

Say, do you have a big workshop to produce those fine blades?

 

Falcon and Mevlana were my favorites amongst the others. Artwise, the blades together with their handles, in my eye, are excellent. Balance, integrity of design, composition, uniqueness, they have all these qualities (of course I'm totaly ignorant regarding the blades--- I wished I could make one for my son!!!)

 

I think you two gentleman are complementing each other, and I wish the best for both of you. It's great to produce such nice pieces of art in a joint effort. Most people are not able to do that, it's too difficult for them, and you have accomplished it! CONGRATULATIONS!!!!

 

 

Best regards,

 

dagistanli

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post-153-1131485818.jpg

Hi all, I thought it was about time I posted rather than just lurking. I am a jeweller from the UK although these days I spend a lot of my time wax carving, I wasn't quite sure for a bit if you would think that I fitted in here but I thought I would see.

  I am a bit of a tool junkie, and cant seem to be able to resist having a go at making my own tools rather than buying them , I will see if I can take some photos to show. It took me about an hour to sort out this one to the right size , I hope!

  Have to go and recover now,

                                              Tim.

 

Hi Tim,

 

I'm sure it's going to be a fine piece of jewelry after you finish casting it, would sure love to see it after you finish!

 

Are you going to make a pendant out of it? If so, how are you planning to hang it?

If you are doing it in gold, then maybe you will add some other pieces with smaller stones to complement the composition?

 

 

Best regards,

 

 

dagistanli

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