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New Work With Antler And Camel Bone


Billy

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Some more work I've been doing since I moved to Australia. The first two are from Camel bone. I've found a local supplier who sells the material ready to carve. Has some lovely natural colouring. Last two are Deer antler tips.

 

Pic 1 - Tawhirimatea - Certainly made his presence felt in Wellington. Inspired by poupou of our more contemporary marae and wharenui. Nephrite inlays. Tāwhiri is the god of weather, including thunder and lightning, wind, clouds and storms. He is a son of Papatūānuku (earth mother) and Ranginui (sky father). In his anger at his brothers for separating their parents, Tāwhirimātea joined his father in the sky then destroyed the forests of Tāne (god of forests), drove Tangaroa (god of the sea) and his progeny into the sea, pursued Rongo and Haumia-tiketike till they had to take refuge in the bosom of their mother, Papa.

 

Pic 2 - Really happy with the finish in this bone. Beautiful natural colouring. Just what I wanted for this simple design. These are classic style hooks, largely made famous by Stephen Myhre’s book. With all due respect to Stephen, as I admire him a great deal, and he would be the first to admit this, but these designs are from ancient carvings often seen in New Zealand’s museums. They are probably one of the most common choice for carvings. The Hei Matau signifies strength and prosperity and provides good luck over water. Being that this is carved from camel bone, and camels are known as the ship of the desert, this should see you in good stead wherever you go ;o)

 

Pic 3 - Upoko o Korero. An aid for reciting whakapapa. This piece represents a kaumatua well versed in the art of storytelling.

 

Pic 4 - Ruaumoko - God of earthquakes. To the wonderful strength of the people of Christchurch. Waiho i te toipoto, kaua i te toiroa.

 

Mauriora, Billy.

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Camel bone!! Very cool!!! Billy - I was impressed with the combination of forms, design and decorative surface detail. I love the toothed edges with bulb like whole pics one and four. The two focus areas of Tawhiri as if two bird heads. A great use of tools to achieve surface results. I am curious about the cross hatched patterns and how these are acheived. Don't know process to become carving path friends but I would like to do that. Anne

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P.S. We (Delaware Institute for the Arts in Education) have just had the Kahurangi Maori Dance Company visit in two Delaware schools. They have a program that portrays the origin story of the separation of mother earth and father sky

The Story of Rangi and Papa http://teaohou.natlib.govt.nz/journals/teaohou/issue/Mao45TeA/c11.html

 

Ranginui is the sky, the father of all things; Papatuanuku is the earth, the mother of all things. In the beginning there was darkness, and these two, the earth and the sky, lay together. They had many children, who lay between them. It was dark for many ages; there was as yet no world with its bright light.

Then their children began to wonder what kind of thing the light could be. They wearied of the narrow space to which they were confined, and wished to separate their parents, so that there could be light. Then they came together to decide whether it would be better to kill their parents or to tear them apart. The fiercest of the children was Tu, the god of war. It was Tu who spoke first, and he said, ‘Let us kill our parents!’

Then Tane, the god and father of forests and of all things that live in them, or that are made from trees, said, ‘No, we will not kill them. It is better to drag them apart, and let the sky be far above us, and the earth lie beneath our feet. In this way the sky will become a stranger to us, but the earth will stay close to us as a mother.’All the brothers agreed to this except for Tawhiri, the father of winds and storms; and he, being afraid that his kingdom was about to be overthrown, was angry at the thought of the separation of his parents. --- needless to say He meets out his revenge for the success of separating these two.

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Hi Anne. Thank you for your kind words.

 

Your observation of Tawhiri is correct. The two 'bird's head' designs are profiles of carved heads. Often thought to be manaia which in fact have the head of a bird. A book I recently read talked about using the manaia design as a profile of a head that depicts an ancestor. The top one is Tawhiri himself, the bottom one represents his fury that is often unleashed on the land.

 

You may be interested in a piece I posted a while back which is my interpretation of the creation myth of Rangi and Papa. Please find the link below.

 

http://www.thecarvingpath.net/forum/index.php?/topic/2379-the-inaugural-dawn/

 

Not sure about the friend thing either. But would like to keep in touch also.

 

Mauriora, Billy.

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As Leonardo Da Vinci said, 'Where the spirit does not work with the hand, there is no art.'

 

In pre-European Maori culture, there was no written language. They told stories through their carving and painting. All their everyday objects had purpose and function and elaborately created to please their Gods. These objects are today are all considered as art. And they all tell a story.

 

Kia ora for your kind words.

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