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Some New Work


Tony N

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Hi Tony,

 

I have a question for you. Would you be willing to give you some constructive criticism, from my perspective, regarding your approach to adding detail and the finishing of your work?

 

Janel

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Hi Tony,

 

I have a question for you. Would you be willing to give you some constructive criticism, from my perspective, regarding your approach to adding detail and the finishing of your work?

 

Janel

alway like advice and help please

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Dear Tony!

 

First i want to thank you for your nice comments on my works. Looking at your pieces, I needed some time to get "used" to it, at first I felt quite disturbed, they made such a rough impression. But after seeing some more of your works I got finaly some understanding in your art. At the moment i focus more on my carving skills and callenge myself in becomming better in even the smalest details. What I lack is some unique style, like you have achieved allready. To me, your work all make sense and i realy look forward to see more of your work!

 

Well done!

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Dear Tony!

 

First i want to thank you for your nice comments on my works. Looking at your pieces, I needed some time to get "used" to it, at first I felt quite disturbed, they made such a rough impression. But after seeing some more of your works I got finaly some understanding in your art. At the moment i focus more on my carving skills and callenge myself in becomming better in even the smalest details. What I lack is some unique style, like you have achieved allready. To me, your work all make sense and i realy look forward to see more of your work!

 

Well done!

 

thank you but your a far better caver than me keep up the good work and so will i hope to be as good as you some day in the way of the finer details

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thank you but your a far better caver than me keep up the good work and so will i hope to be as good as you some day in the way of the finer details

You are to kind! I would gladly exchange any of my works for one of yours and i think i had the better deal!. Don´t be so modest about your own work! ;)

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Tony,

 

I apologize for not responding right away. I have been called away to help a family member who is in the hospital, and it is not easy to think about carving at this moment. I will respond when I can.

 

Janel

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Hi Tony,

 

Thank you for your patience. I would like to write about two things: 1) flowing lines, either in a drawing or in a carving design; 2) using tools to help create a flowing line in a carving.

 

A straight line or a smoothly flowing curve can be elegant and powerful additions to a drawing or to a carving. When the line is not quite straight or smoothly flowing, the irregularities interrupt the movement of the viewer's eyes as they move around the drawing or the carving, perhaps causing the eyes to pause to look at that part more closely.

 

When carving with a power rotary tool, it is not always easy to create a smoothly flowing curve or straight line, and it is not always the best tool to create a finished look to the small carved design.

 

When I look at the piece in the bottom image, I see the smoothly flowing line of the outer edge, all around the piece. I see four shapes carved into the oval form where the shape on the top left relates to the shape on the bottom right, and the upper right shape relates to the bottom left. I like that kind of relationship.

 

The sets of related cut out shapes are each irregular in related way. What I see with the quality of the carving in those cut out areas is a degree of finishing that I personally would like to be more carefully worked on. Doing that would strengthen the details that you have added, by taking care of the roughness in the lines that you have created in those cut out shapes.

 

For this piece I am not suggesting completely straightening the lines. I suggest smoothing the roughness so that the beauty of the bone can be seen and the movement of the detail's lines are cleaner. The goal would be to remove the marks that the power tool burr left on the sides of the cut out areas.

 

There are at least two ways to approach this:

1) By using a jewelers file, the roughness left by the power cutting tool could be smoothed. Perhaps a file that has a flat side and a rounded side in one file that would fit into the small space of the cut out, and perhaps one that is all round that has a very thin point that would fit into the even smaller spaces of the cut out.

and

2) Using wet/dry sand paper wrapped around a bamboo skewer thin enough to reach inside the cut out form is a very useful approach to smoothing roughness. There are larger and smaller kinds of bamboo skewers that might be found at grocery stores. The skewers have a pointed end and a flat end. Each end is useful as a tool end. They can also be cut and shaped, if that helps make the tool more useful.

 

I would cut the sanding paper into rectangles that are small enough to wrap around the skewer end and to be pinched by your fingers to keep it in place while sanding.

 

At first I would use a little more coarse grit, such as 220 or 320 to remove the roughness, then use 400 and 600 to bring a smooth quality to the surface. I have not worked with bone so I do not know if a higher grit is helpful if you are not going for a glossy, scratch free sheen.

 

I hope that these suggestions will be useful to you in some way as you make more pieces.

 

Kindest regards,

 

Janel

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