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Kagamibuta Netsuke In Shibuichi


Jim Kelso

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I have wanted for some years to revisit the netsuke world which I was immersed in some years ago.

 

Having also dipped(so-to-speak) back into the Japanese water-casting(yuwake) earlier in the year I wanted to make something from a nice little shibuichi ingot produced then.

 

The obvious convergence of these impulses is a type of netsuke known as a kagamibuta(mirror-lid), which typically have a metal plate set into a bowl made most often of ivory or wood. It has been at least 20 years, I think, since I last made one of these so I was interested to see what I would bring to it with a bit more skill (let’s hope!) and some different aesthetics as well.

 

The photo doesn’t do justice to the nashiji(pear-skin) grain in the shibuichi and I’ll try to get a better photo of that. The smaller photo shows the piece roughly to scale (40mm diameter). The inlays are copper and gold. The wood is Ziricote.

 

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This is beautiful to see. Quiet, serene, calming.

The photography is very complimentary, though I imagine seeing the piece for real is a much better experience. Thank you for posting this piece.

I am curious about what the Japanese water-casting(yuwake) is about.

Janel

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Thanks Tony and Janel.

 

Janel, yuwake involves pouring molten alloys of silver, copper and gold into a cotton cloth suspended in water. If done well this results in a very clean circular ingot.

 

You can see more here:

http://forums.dfoggknives.com/index.php?showtopic=22507&st=0

 

Ford also has information and a video.

 

Jim

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i realy enjoy this and that you said it is used on bowl intrigues me. i am a turner and i make lots of candy dishes and bowls plus im thinking of geting into black smithing at least a intro class to figure out if it is something that i would like to do regularly. so the thought of puting this into the bottom of a bowl has be wanting to experiment. can you tell me what is necisary to try this on a small scale?

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too bad we are so far away i think the two of us could team up and create some realy nice projects. but from your site you are so far beyond me i know i would take a back stage to you and learn a great deal from your years of work. i would realy like to see your shop i know that alot of people show there work space and for some reason that has aways inturested me more or at least as much as the art work. perhaps you can add that to your site.

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i always said that if its clean you dont use it. a shop should have dust and at least one machine being taken apart to "fix" while i have eliminated most of the clutter in my classroom there is still bits and pieces of this and that all over the shop. and if it was perfect that just means the kids arent geting there hands dirty. the nice thing is that once a quarter myself and a bunch of the boys......and my fellow teacher (sometimes helps a little)(long frustraiting story lets not go there) take the shop apart and clean it from top to bottom.

 

jim have you thought of doing some video lessons like the http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/ i know i would definatly be inturested in watching them. i think marc does prity good with his guild memberships and sponsors ect..... his forum is very busy i check it twice a day and i can hardly keep up with all the posts and discussions. and i know that your style of work is very popular now in craftsmanship and decoration at least in the chicago area. in the art district of chicago last time i went there was all kinds of serenic type of furniture, pictures, and decorations.

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Thanks Dan. It comes down to how you want to spend your time, especially coming into the home stretch as I am. I do a little teaching as here and there, but mostly I want to spend time at the bench, and think that it's what I have to offer of most value.

 

Jim

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dont blame you sad thing is master craftsman dont start out young it takes a life time to become a master(fustraiting as all hell :)) maybe think about just recording your work someday after you and i are long gone they will look at your work and wonder. if there is videos out there they can see why you became the craftsman that you are. and learn from you thanks for the discussion and ill ilways be looking for your work. you have inspired me to save up and buy some powered carving tools so that i can serously start carving on my lathe. and now i want to start incorporating metal into my wood turnings. dont know if i should thank you or hate you. ;)

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sad thing is master craftsman dont start out young it takes a life time to become a master(fustraiting as all hell :)) . dont know if i should thank you or hate you. ;)

 

As you say Dan, it's a lifetime proposition. I'm better off when I consider myself a student rather than how accomplished I may be or not. No sadness as I see it, otherwise, if it was easy, who would care?

I know you're joking about the hate, but I think you're on to something in that, it's good to look straight on at what stirs us up. Pain and dignity live in the same house and should be happy cohabiting.

 

Jim

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  • 7 months later...

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