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New Member From Hawaii


Tom Mehau

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Aloha,

 

My name is Tom and I come from Waimea on the Big Island of Hawaii. Not exactly a new member, as I have been lurking here since July 2010. It's probably just good manners to introduce myself already.

 

In June 2010 I signed up for the HOEA art program in Waimea. The purpose of this school was to identify and train Native Hawaiian artists, and it was there that I met my Maori carving instructor Stacy Gordine and started carving. I'm guessing some of you might have had a similar reaction as I did, which was a feeling of being immediately obsessed. Sometimes I'd rather carve than eat, which is saying a lot for this Hawaiian. But life makes demands and I have only been able to produce a handful of pieces in the last two years.

 

I love the smale scale stuff and will continue working down here as long as my eyes hold out.

 

I am grateful for the sharing and support of this community and I am humbled and inspired by your collective talent.

 

Mahalo for your hospitality. Below is my first carving, "Mo'o".

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Tom,

Being your first carving I must say that you were born a carver. I have to agree that this reminds me to of M.C.Escher and I love it, keep carving and keep sharing on the forum.

 

All my best ....... Danny

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Thanks for the feedback guys. The material is cowbone which is really easy to get around here. And yeah Bruce I used a Foredom rotary tool. I wouldn't know where to begin if I had to hand carve a piece!

 

This started as a yin yang design but I was in a Hawaiian school so I thought I would layer the mo'o (the Hawaiian gecko) over it and this is what it ended up as.

 

I'm glad some of you see M.C. Escher's influence in here because he definitely impacted my brain from the time I was a kid and someone gave me a book of his work. I might as well post a picture of my fourth carving, "Laukolu", which was directly inspired by his woodcut of flatworms. Laukolu in Hawaiian loosely translates to Three Leaves. This one is from cow bone also, but I did make a second version out of jade later on.

 

Thanks again fellas...

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Hello Tom,

 

It is good to read about your carving and see what you are exploring. You are right about how compelling carving can be. You mentioned "I wouldn't know where to begin if I had to hand carve a piece!" It begins when the power tools can not do what you see needs doing.

 

The Laukolu is fascinating. At first I found it hard to count three leaves, being sure that there were four of them. They are all connected in a twisted line, which moves on forever.

 

You are carving much air into your pieces already, which I find very interesting. Negative space can be a strong element to a design.

 

I look forward to seeing more as you are able to carve and share.

 

Janel

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Thanks for your comments Janel, especially the perspective on the limitations of power tools.

 

I'm glad I finally gave myself permission to throw my hat into the ring here.

 

I have a handful of carving friends here on island and we have each other to bounce ideas and observations around. Which is good.

 

But I wanted to thank you personally for maintaining this wonderful place where we can meet and talk to so many more like minded and extremely talented people.

 

And thank you for setting the tone of friendliness and mutual support. I really appreciate this place.

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Kia ora Tom. Must admit, a great start to your carving journey. I know Stacy Gordine myself, and what better instructor to get you on your way. I look forward to seeing more work.

 

Mauriora, Billy.

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Hello Tom,

 

It is a pleasure to be able to observe the interactions of the members as they join the forum and grow as a result of shared knowledge. It keeps me connected to the rest of you, and I learn a lot as a result.

 

Just a brief recap of TCP's history. When I began carving, my peers were mostly international, with no local or regional others who shared the uniquely small carving style that I was and still am pursuing. When my web site went on line in the late 90's I began to receive questions from international others who had many questions which I answered one at a time. This forum began in 2005 from a need for bringing the questioners and answerers together in a larger, diverse community. It is always the members who keep it going. I just keep the lights on, the spammers out, and when life permits I offer some insight or help. I am thankful to everyone who contributes and asks questions. You create a learning place for all others who watch and read the forum regularly.

 

Meanwhile, don't be afraid to try some hand tools some day, if only to flatten a plane or straighten a curve, or to sharpen a transition from one element to the next with an undercut. You might find an even more compelling urge to keep carving emerge as a result. It all depends on what you envision each piece to become.

 

Smiles to you,

 

Janel

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Hi Christophe,

 

I'm thinking maybe I'll post the jade Laukolu in the New Work area if that's ok? Even though it's not exactly new I'd still call it significant.

 

So maybe I'll shoot over there next. Thanks so much everyone for welcoming me to the Carving Path.

 

Tom

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