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New Work


Debbie K

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Hello everybody! It's been a while since I've posted any new work, mostly because I've been too lazy to take any photos. I'm only posting a few a time as to not overwhelm you guys.

 

This piece is tongua nut in sterling silver with tourmaline crystals, citrines, turquoise, peridots and garnets. I've had this piece in a box in pieces for a couple of years and finally got the nerve to try to put it together. The construction leaves something to be desired, but I like the design.

 

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Michael, do you recognize the rhodonite?

 

post-1996-0-11600500-1344977854.jpgpost-1996-0-91435500-1344977390.jpg

 

The pendant is sterling silver, enamel, glass and rhodonite. Isn't it amazing how the profile was there in the stone? I just followed the rock where it wanted to go on both of the pieces.

 

I'll put up a few more tomorrow.

 

Debbie K

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Debbie, simply incredible, you have a very wide range of ability, able to use the stones natural shape to create beauty in art is astounding, great to see our rhodonite in the hands of a master carver, and silversmith artist, I usually don,t like parting with the A grade material but in your case awesome result.

 

Cheers michael B

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Thanks, you guys! Thanks especially to you, Michael, I still haven't gotten the nerve up to tackle that piece of pyroxmangite. It's such a good piece it deserves something really special.

 

I had trouble riveting that first one together, it had to be done from the front. I'm not very good at the jewelry end of things, so I didn't know about centering drills and how you use them to keep the drill bit from "drifting" when it tries to follow the angle of the metal. Live and learn. Those citrines drove me crazy; I know next to nothing about stone setting but this piece made me get a little better. I didn't crack a single one (yeah!).

 

Debbie

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Micahel:

 

They're solid glass beads on top of glass enamel. I cheated and used epoxy. The glass beads are able to be fused to the glass enamel, but my high temp solder (IT, for anyone who's interested) had already begun to separate from the bezel and the back, and I didn't dare fire it again. I couldn't fuse them before I put the piece together, as heating the piece even enough to get EZ solder to flow is enough to melt the enamel. Enameling always poses all kinds of construction issues: I usually find a way to do it mechanically, but I was assured that the IT solder was sufficiently strong to stand many firings. It failed after the fourth firing.

 

You live and learn, I just wish I'd learn enough to not run into all these problems. I've had enough learning experiences lately!

 

Debbie

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