Jump to content

A Few New Pieces


Janel

Recommended Posts

While catching up with the deskwork after the show last weekend, I will be processing photos of the newest work. Photos will be posted from time to time.

 

The wood for this piece was given to me by someone who had been in Africa decades ago, and had brought home a hunk of it. I had two suggestions of what it might be: African Blackwood, which I am a bit skeptical about that; the other was Cape Ebony, which is more believable because the artist showed me a piece or two of his work, and the same bright chatoyance gleamed when moved about in the light. The small sculptural form does show the gleam, but it is subtle.

 

This could function as a netsuke, the himotoshi being formed by the space between the legs and above the feet. Such a himotshi is referred to as a "natural himotoshi", and its use is my preference when ever possible.

 

The wood is extremely dense and fine grained. With the close in photography, one can see that the wood does have open cells interspersed, where as a flat tray or surface would not show that feature.

 

To achieve this glossy surface, I scraped with the sharpened straight edge tools until scratches were gone, then shifted to 1000, 1500, 2000, wet/dry papers, then to micro-mesh 3,200 to 12,000. (I have a set of about seven cloths from Rockler Woodworking, 2,400 to 12,000.) This bring quite a luster to the wood, but could be muted by moisture from the hand, so I used Minwax Woodsheen Rubbing Oil Stain and Finish, the one with no color added. It sets up quickly within minutes of application, with rubbing and wiping excess from all the recesses. After a day or so Renaissance Wax was applied, to give a little more shine and protection from handling at the shows. This particular rubbing oil does not provide as hard a surface as a urethane oil finish, but I chose to not add that to this piece.

 

This kind of wood and gloss is very difficult to photograph, which could be part of a topic in the Photography section some day.

 

483_1w.jpg

 

483_2w.jpg

 

Janel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In July I taught a small, private workshop to three women artists. The challenge posed was an apple leaf with a lady bug on it. This is my version of it. The greater challenge during the class was to learn how to make tools from scratch. We had good fun together.

 

This is boxwood, from a source in Pennsylvania.

 

482_1t.jpg 482_2t.jpg

 

 

I have since added abraded silver jump rings to mount this as a pendant from a nicer necklace. Those things arrived after the photo session. Doing this is an early foray into exploring wearable pieces.

 

The whole piece was given two or three extremely thin applications of shellac (thank you Mark Strom). The lady bug has acrylic paint dots and oil paint coloration. The shellac surface was gone over with what ever fine grit micro-mesh that would produce no visible scratches, but resulted in a hazy, softened surface.

 

 

Janel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

wih the size of your rabbit and the color its hard to tell i could be blackwood but your right your piece has a clearer shine then i have seen on black wood in the past. but that is no always a given because i came across a photo of a wood turned box that has a prity clear shine. (want to use as inspuration for my own box). unless you can see the tree or even a large board of the wood its difficult to tell the types of wood it is from just a small piece of wood. i think you will have to just be saisfied witht the fact that i looks wonderful.

 

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=African+Blackwood&view=detail&id=A6CD00833469608589F89C800136C12DE2FCED71&first=501

 

i realy like the leaf but i got to say i would not or what i mean is i could not wear it. as i would be afaid that it would break. it looks so delicate

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...