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Bracelet #5


JP Anderson

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My latest bracelet. Sterling Silver, 6", push graved. It's unofficial name "To Each Their Own".

 

I'll post more photos after it's bent. I used a photo editor to mask and blacken the background. I'm not sure that's a good idea or not. It photographed better than I had hoped for a shinny object.

 

All comments and critique are welcome.

 

John

 

post-1995-0-58127300-1347453969.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's the bracelet post bending and polishing. It was hard to photograph with the polished finish and Pam and I ended up with the camera reflection. I'm going to build a better photo setup that's permanent rather than our make shift kitchen counter with white sheets and paper towels. For this picture Pam snapped the shutter while I held up a curtain of paper towel to break up the reflections. It's the best of 35 or so variations in the setup.

 

My personal critique is that I'm still struggling with getting the surfaces perfectly smooth.

 

Push graving is engraving without power assist from a hammer or air. You use your hand to wiggle and push the tool through the metal much like a wood palm chisel. It's works well in soft metals like silver and copper. It's a peaceful process.

 

John

 

post-1995-0-95706400-1348355298.jpg

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Hi John,

 

It is good to see this one completed and ready for wearing. You have also found a solution to the glare problem with photographing highly reflective materials. If you take time to browse through photo set ups that others have posted here and there on the forum, you might figure out something that will suit your own needs.

 

One comment I have is a hope that you will learn to use the White Balance on the camera to match the lighting source. At the same time, limit the light source to a single type. If there is daylight in the room via a window, and it shows on the object, then use a daylight balanced electric light source then set the camera to daylight setting. Or, block out the light and then match the camera setting to the sort of lamp that is providing the light. Mixing light sources wreck havoc with the outcome of images, where it is difficult to render a photo with accurate colors, which I believe might be the case with the above photo. It may be that the paper towel added a cast to the light as it passed through the paper, since there seems to be an overall orange cast to the image. Some day, when there is time, I daydream of posting a longer discussion about photographing small works.

 

Thank you for showing us your new piece!

 

Janel

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>I daydream of posting a longer discussion about photographing small works.

 

I hope you get chance. Thanks for the tips on using the White Balance. We've been focused on dealing the reflections. If noting else this carving is going to force me become a better photographer.

 

John

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Janel,

 

I found the White Balance controls on our camera. I plead ignorance as adjusting the White Balance has never entered my mind. Thank you so much for bringing it to my attention. Up to now I wasn't interested in selling my work. I had other reasons to carve and wanted to focus on the art. Times change and I recently opened an etsy.com site with a few items. Suddenly quality photos are really important.

 

As usual one thing leads to another. For completely unrelated reasons I was reading up on color calibration and color profiles for monitors and they suggest the monitor, camera and printer all need to be calibrated to match up. I'm going to do more homework and I'll post my findings and results. I'll probably need to ask a few more questions. We need to change the name of this thread to "Helping John Fix His Bad Photos".

 

John

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  • 2 months later...

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