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Snowshoe Rabbit Redo


Mark Strom

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I finished the original in 2010 and personally was very happy with the way it came out and it was well received here on the forum.

 

Of course it went out to the galleries and for some reason was not well received by the galleries. One gallery had it on displasy for less than a month before they requested I pick it up. Well to make a long story short, I decided to rework it with the new technique of finishing with the artist oils and glazes. My thought was it would either be a grand failure or it would be something very new and unique.

 

Here is the before and after. What is your opinion on the change...disaster or sucess?

 

Mark Strom

www.stromcarver.com

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post-727-0-32451500-1355113597.jpg

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Hi Mark,

 

As far as I am concern, I would say that before and after are successes.

As for galleries opinion...well....it reminds me of one documentary I watch last year "Exit through the gift shop", it is about street art and made by Banksy. I don't know if you've heard about him but, to cut a long story short, this documentary is worth watching, it's been said that it was a mockumentary, whether or not it is true, I do find that it is a good reflexion on art and what is seen as art.

In the end Warhol, Pollock and plenty of other were the highligth of galleries at some point.....;)

 

Christophe

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Hi Mark,

 

Christophe said it well, both presentations are successes. It will be interesting to learn about the change and how the gallery or viewers see or perceive the piece.

 

I fear that the gallery's clientele are of a sort that needs completed definition, sort of like looking at a cartoon and needing it to be colored in instead of left as a black and white drawing to make it whole.

 

For me, the nuances of light and shadow on the naturally colored wood pulls me in to see more and leaves room for my imagination to play with it. Much like walking and appreciating the changing shadows as the sun continues to move towards the end of the day. Moods are set and changed by the angle of light, and with the first version of your piece, so too would change with the light and shadow available to it.

 

The colored version takes away the guess work, or the room for suggestive interpretation. Some people need that, some don't, um, that is, some viewers will need the color to "see" the story, and won't see that the color might limit that story.

 

I do appreciate the opportunity to see both versions. They are both successful, each in their own way. Both work, for various different reasons. Thank you for presenting them both to us to view.

 

Janel

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i do like some strong definition there was plenty in the background and in the foreground there isent much shading or detail i think at minimum you could do a little shading. but you should decide if the art work is for others or yourself make your artwork for yourself or build it to sell. i would like to also see what the galleries opinions area after the changes. one thing of critique is that there is no shadows so a little blue and purple on the foreground to creat shadows from the rabit and the branches would make them stand out farther and look more three domensional. the tree has tons of detail but there is no deffinition on the rabit or the ground.

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I agree with the observations listed. The painting did take some of the mystery out of it. The paint added about as much as it took away. As for the painting...it is a learning curve for me and the one thing I try to be concious of is to not get to "painterly" and do to much. In my defesnse there are some subtlies in the snow that do not show up in the photograph not only due to the size of the file but due to my lack of photographic skills.

 

I am enjoying the new freedom from previous conventions of mine. These days all my focus is on doing what I want and to push my personal envelope. There are some who aren't to happy with the new directions, not because of the quailty of the work but due to their own opinions concerning simplicity and coloring. Such is life! Learning to use the camera and lighting is a real challenge but fun in its own right. I think after all the years I have put in it is about time to really work on what I want for my own reasons, being a rsponsible adult is overated.

 

Mark

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  • 2 weeks later...

Mark ...

 

I like the original, as well. I"ve had a similar 'quandry', myself .. with wood burning. I have tried coloring some woodburns I've done. Some come out well, some, a bit 'over done'. It's easy to get carried away with the coloring. Maybe I missed it somewhere along the line ... what is the medium? Is this a wood carving? If it's wood, a couple things might be interesting to try, but I wouldn't want to do either to such a nice original!

 

ONe would be to 'color' with wood-burning. This can be over done, as in painting .. or just every so lightly, to enhance the shadows, crevices, etc. It might give the work even more depth.

 

Another would be to color, but try other kinds. i.e. pastels, oil pencils, etc. I've gotten some nice results with just ever-so-slightly coloring with oil pencils. My problem has been where to STOP with the coloring!

 

I think this is pretty subjective. I think the original is beautiful work without adding anything.

 

Dennis

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