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Cord For Bone Hook Necklace - Source Needed


Ryan N.

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Hope this is the right place for this question. I'm looking for a source for the waxed cord pictured below. I also see this cord in IrishCarver's piece on Etsy. I'm looking for it already woven/braided (looks like the Diamond Stitch Braid). I bought two thicknesses of hemp (.5mm and 1mm) to braid my own, and that isn't working out well. Plus, the 1mm is too thick and .5mm seems thinner than this. I've checked with my local crafts stores and they have no clue. Thanks for your help!

post-3602-0-31134200-1359057909.jpg

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Hi Ryan,

 

You might try "beading" supply stores, brick and mortar or on line. The lashing around the top if the hook looks like two ply, or may have been reduced from more ply but seems too smooth for that, as in there is not a gap in the ply.

 

I looked for 4 ply braid and found this utube demo:

 

As the fellow describes the steps, the ply that is going to be braided gets twisted, then moved behind the other ply ... the twisting of the ply may explain why the ply in the cord shown above looks more twisted than the two-ply used to attach the cord to the hook.

 

Good luck with this. I am interested in seeing how you work it out.

 

Janel

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Hi again,

 

Your quest has captured my attention, and I have come across some information in Stephen Myhre's "Bone Carving" book. About cords for lashing, beginning on page 94-95, he mentions choosing Beeswax-dressed nylon to make his cords with. He goes on further describing how he makes his cords. His technique is similar to kumihimo. (When I saw the image that you added, I thought about kumihimo, but did not mention it earlier.) For this technique he rigged up circular form with a hole in it, similar to a kumihimo loom in function.

 

On an internet searchI used "waxed nylon cord" and found a variety of resources for that material. Waxed linen is also available. If you search for kumihimo you will likely find a trail to what a loom looks like and how it functions. Stephen's loom appears to be a circle on a stick, attached to a bench or table with a C clamp.

 

The loom and Stephen's circle both have a hole in the middle for the cord being made to emerge from as the strands are braided from above. The emerging cord is weighted, and the strands being braided are weighted (equally weighted). This system, once a person gets into a rhythm with the process, has a greater chance of creating an even plaiting than shown in the demonstration above (maybe).

 

I am glad that you asked about the cord resource. I needed to find a solution last week for a project, and finally decided on using a thin, round black leather cord. I ended up using three ply and just doing a loose braid because the attached wood things were on three different strands. A fourth strand would have worked into the concept and then the necklace part could have had a more attractive and stronger appearance. Oh well. This is good information to be thinking about for future ideas.

 

I hope that you will be able to find the resource for the cord that you wish to use.

 

Janel

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Thanks Janel. Your research and responses have been useful. I never thought (or heard of) Kumihimo, but I see the similarities. The braiding video is the Diamond Stitch Braid, but with doubled strings. I did it without doubling the strings and that might explain why it came out thinner with the .5mm. And the twisting does explain why the cord in my pic would look that way.

 

I hear a lot about Myhre's book. I'd like to at least read his section on cords for lashing and see his loom. The hand braiding I did was time intensive and sloppy; that's why I was hoping to find a more efficient means (either buying cord already braided or finding the "trick", aka. loom!).

 

If anyone has a source for this that they did not have to braid, I'm all ears. Thanks again for these responses and I'll update what I find myself.

 

-Ryan

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Hi Ryan,

 

One trick with hand braiding seems to be making sure that each action is done snugly, keeping the strands tightened equally. If you fix the beginning end securely to something, you can then pull against it while keeping some degree of tension on all of the strands while working. The Kumihimo loom with weighted bobbins and the cord being weighted provides some of that tension. Your movements of the cord to the same spots over and over again, I think, would then create an even cord.

 

There are lots of kinds of cord available on line. Using the key words waxed linen, or waxed nylon, or perhaps kumihimo supplies, waxed lashing cord, all sorts of things will pop up. I look at the images that the search engine finds, rather than the text responses. I can quickly scan the results. I also use more than one search engine, as they all don't always find the same things equally.

 

I like to actually see what I am buying, but I live a ways from the city and sometimes have to do the modern thing and shop on line. At least purchasing a spool of cord for under $10 is not such a big investment, and could provide practice materials for working on braiding patterns if what arrives is not quite what was expected.

 

I hope you find what will work for you.

 

Janel

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thanks. I've gotten a few different spools but I'm liking a waxed nylon I found online that's .7mm (a little thinner than what's pictured above when braided four-ply). Now I'm just trying to perfect my braiding and wrapping technique (while waiting for my copy of Myhre's book to arrive!). I'll update with pics when I have something worthy. ;-)

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  • 2 weeks later...

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