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Pink Ivory Wood


Ed Twilbeck

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I just got some pink ivory wood . Has any carved this? I am looking for info on how to show the pink more and highlight the grain. What finish did you use ?

Any one has any idea on how to make it more ,,,(Pink) ?

The first carving will be a dragonfly pendant for a necklace.

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Hi Ed,

 

I worked only one time with a small piece that I made into a knife handle and a small bead, so I am no expert but here is how I did.

It is a beautiful but really hard wood. I push the sanding to 2000 grit but I think if I had to rework with it, I would probably push 'til 4000 maybe more, to really achieve a nice glossy polish (that will highlight the pink) . For the finish I use a mix of beeswax and colza oil. It has aged to a more reddish colour but I'm also using the knife in environment which are quite dirty so...For the bead, so far it is still a nice pink colour.

Hope this help.

Good luck with your project and keep a sharpening device close ;)

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ok from what i found out it dulls tool fairly quickly so sharpen often and finishes i was told anything you will use for ebony, rosewood ect.....

 

this is what i was told for price It used to be one of the rarest woods in the world. $125 a pound, that translated to $375 a board ft in the early 1980's. I got a 6" x 1" x 2" piece with a crack in it for $25

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Hi Ed,

 

PInk Ivory wood can be fun to work with. The long term downside is that with exposure to light and air, the reds/pinks fade away to brown tones. :( That has been frustrating. I don't believe that there is any coating or finish that will keep that from happening, though I don't know everything about what is available.

 

Yes, PI is quite a hard wood, but it is much like some of the boxwoods and other hard woods that I carve. My style of carving involves using scraping/planing actions with well sharpened tools, developed from using very hard woods. This is one wood that is worked that way, and with well sharpened tools at the end, you can achieve a nearly smooth surface that needs very little sanding. Yes, going up in the four digit papers will bring a gloss.

 

The last PI I tried a different approach, which began with an attempt to stabilize a crack in the wood with cyanoacrylate (super-glue). The application changed the surrounding wood color, so I just went with it and spread it around the entire piece, multiple times. It sanded to a good surface and I think that it is glossy with the high number papers. I likely used Renaissance Wax at the end.

 

469.jpg

 

A different piece I likely used Woodsheen Rubbing Oil/Stain natural (as in no) color, rubbed on and off, and buffed with soft cloth. Then Ren. Wax.

 

384__1.jpg

 

Have fun!

 

Janel

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Thanks for the info, Janel the leaves are fantastic.

I found that cutting the PI down to size was easy with the Japanese pull saws,,, and a jeweler's saw with a small thin blade cutting on the pull stroke. I have done some carving pon the PI with knives, not to bad small light cuts with sharp blades. Most of the shaping is being done with my foredom,, with cutters and sanding drums all at a moderately slow speed. So far good.

I have been finishing most of my carvings with carnauba wax, applied with a chamois wheel and the buffed with a chamois wheel. If you leave any marks with sanding or tool marks,, they show with the carnauba wax.

Later I will post some pics ...

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I would guess that UV blocking should keep the pink colour for much longer. It's a component of some artists' laquers, some come in spray cans. I know, not the sort of thing I'd use on a small carving, but I simply don't know if UV block is available on its own, so you can mix it in with whatever you use for finishing.

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ed a good finish is marine varnish it is desighned to protect against uv radiation and on the water there is alot more because it reflects off the water as well as from above. you might want to look into those types of finishes.

 

also might i sugest that instead of the foredom that you use knives and save your shavings. because the wood is so rare you probably wont get too many chances in the future especiayl with climate changes in africa right now. then you can take the shavings and use them for inlay. i just got done making a bear keychain using purple heart and it has a very inturesting color to it a deep rich purple. and because it was made from chips and saw dust it almost looks like it floats in the wood. im thinking the pink color woud look realy nice in some mahogany or contrasting walnut, perhaps use as the heart of some maple.

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Pictures of the Pink Ivory and some of the other wood,,, and what I am working on ,,,, the wood is hard to carve,,, but it will finish out very nice... The 2 piece Dragonfly was a little more challenge to carve the notches to put them together. But the fitting worked out good. Just sanding enough now to see the color and grain. .... Will finish only with carnauba wax and buffing. The color is good. Don't want to change it.

post-107-0-64015300-1363029589.jpg

post-107-0-09226100-1363029616.jpg

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After some trail and work I have found that the knives by Flexcut seem to work best for this type of woods. With small thin cuts, mostly a slicing cut, and keep honing , the cutting is going faster. I would rather use cutting tools than grinding tools. Just thought some might like to know that the spring steel tools by Flexcut work great for me. I do not have any ties with Flexcut other than I am a fan and own several of the tools.

post-107-0-12034000-1363278830.jpg

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Bella ,,, pink ivory is pretty and hard to carve. I use knives chisels and rotary tools.

Janel has a way of carving , that she can explain to you better than I can.

I recommend use a saw and a rotary tool to rough out and get as close to the shape you want and then finish with the chisels and knives, then a lot of sanding. If you cut against the grain with pink ivory that is very dry the grain will chip and some times splinter. So try to cut with the grain as much as possible and keep all tools sharp and well honed .

Bella P M me any time for any more info , and check with Janel for her knowledge she is always very helpful.

 

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Hi,

 

Look at Getting Started and Resources, there is an old video that I made using tools based on Stephen Myhre's style tools and how I hold and use tools. My tool selection is different now, but the key technique for holding the tool and carving and using one's thumb as a fulcrum while sweeping (scraping or planing) to-and-fro according to the grain of the wood is still valid.

 

http://www.thecarvingpath.net/forum/index.php?/topic/939-small-carving-instructional-videos/page__view__findpost__p__7967

 

This technique evolved on its own and was also introduced to me by KOMADA Ryushi, a Japanese netsuke carver and teacher of netsuke carving. It is a very effective and efficient technique for small-sized carving. It is not the only way I move tools around, but it is adaptable and versatile.

 

Janel

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