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Corian Grinding For Inlay


Dan

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I did a search and only thing I can find on here is that you can carve it like ivory but no grain. What I want to do is use it for inlay so I want to crush up corian into small pebbles and dust to use for a inlay. Anyone have any ideas how I can break it up into small pieces? Thought it would make a cheap and easy inlay.

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  • 2 weeks later...

ok played with breaking it up grinder wont work, blender wont work, just throws it around or stops the blade. the machines just dont have enough tork or crushing action to break up the corian. my best bet was to put it in a coffie can cut a hole in the lid i then attached a large metal pipe flange to a length of pipe and fit the lid around the pipe. i then wacked on the pipe to break the corian into pieces. i use couple different size strainers to sort the corian into different size piles some dust some small chunks. i have yet to try a inlay with it i think that will be next soon as i have a project to try inlaying with.

 

the corian is very strong as a whole but it fracture easily like ceramics. so blunt force trama seems to be the best method. after i do a inlay ill let everyone know how it turned out. unfortantly all the scrap i got were white and grey i would like to get some crazy colors to use for inlay but i think corian would make a great medium for doing inlays of rocks or mountains. man why cant people want purple counters or lime green tables :)

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I'll take a stab at answering this. I haven't tried to do this per se, but I can imagine a couple things that might work.

 

First, you need to set up something to "collect" the dust/debris. A disk sander, belt sander, or a router will make short work of the material. Depending on how large you want the chunks to be, the router will probably work best, since corian is a plastic and will melt a bit and gum up the sanding disk/belt if you let it get too hot from friction.

 

Some years ago I set up a small disk sander to catch dust from various materials for my godfather by attaching a low horse power motor to a hinged base so that it could tip up to empty a plexiglass box that sits under the sanding platform. The sanding disk sits with almost the entire lower half inside the plexiglass box so that almost all the dust collects inside of the box. To retrieve the dust, you unlock and tilt the motor, disk, and platform out of the way and simply lift out the plexiglass box. The courser the sanding disk, the courser the particles you end up with, but you will get minute traces of the fractured sanding abrasives in your particles.

 

Alternatively, you could use a course file if you don't mind the elbow grease. Advantages - no loud motors or sanding abrasives in your dust. I'd recommend a file designed for plastics, such as laminates. The teeth are formed differently and won't clog up as quickly with plastics. Don't forget to use a file card or steel wire brush to clean the file as soon as it does start clogging. If you let the clogs pack into the teeth, you'll be picking them out with a dental pick or (worse) ruin the file.

 

Last method that comes to mind, since you mentioned a lathe in your previous post, clean up well around your lathes. Then mount a piece of corian between centers or however you are comfortable doing it, and turn it into bits with a sharp bowl gouge at slow speeds. Remember, this is similar to face plate turning, not spindle turning, so spindle or roughing gouges would not be safe to use. Alternatively, scrapers should work as well. Just don't get to aggressive or it could shatter. I'd also recommend cutting it into rounds about 6" or smaller so that there is less deflection and chattering in the piece as you press against it. And remember, just because you don't see deflection doesn't mean that it's not there. A spinning piece, even at slow speeds, can deflect about 1/32 of an inch without being visible - more than enough for a very nasty catch.

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thanks devon i dont want to make super fine powder from a router or a sander because then it does not have as nice a apearence when you inlay it it just looks like a solid shape. if you use difference size pieces where some are small and some are big then you get a visual differences. i did find the discription of you collection for the sander inturesting and would like to see it.

 

corian fractures like pottery it maybe some kind of blastic but if i set it on a hard surface like the cement and hit it with a hammer pieces fly out from the impace a few inches. i then took those smaller pieces and put them in a coffie can and hit them a bunch of times and strained the stuff that came out. i got all kinds of size corien pebbles. including a fine dust for filling in tiny holes.

 

as for lathe turning here are some videos of stuff that can be made with corian

 

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=turning+corian+on+lathe&mid=2E1F7B82ECD2557310DF2E1F7B82ECD2557310DF&view=detail&FORM=VIRE4

 

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/54209

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