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Guest DFogg

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I have been working on a carved handle this week so I thought I would share.

 

post-1-1129715663.jpg

 

I am doing the crash course on raised work. It has involved making lots of little tools, but the most useful so far has been reground engraving tools. I am down to the final 10% which usually takes 90% of the time, but love the quiet space I get into when I am carving. I can see why you have given your lives to this craft. Maybe one day I will attempt something representational. Anyway, thought I would share.

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It is good to see the new work! To carve lines such as you have is a real challenge, when keeping the line flowing from one end to the other. This is lovely!

 

I also see the poster-tacky-sticky-stuff holding the work down :D , yay!

 

Janel

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Thanks for the great tip Janel. Actually, I don't have enough chips in the poster putty to keep it from sticking to the piece so I gave up on it and am using Sculpty polymer clay. It seems to work for me, but the idea is all yours. It has taken the cramps out of my holding hand and lowered the odds of sticking myself.

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Thanks Kath.

 

The holding problem is solved with Janel's putty. I have had to make lots of tools for this job and admit that I like that part of it too. The hours do fly by though and am going to have to control myself or I will go broke doing it.

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Hi Don,

Nice work. When you say raised, do you mean from the back, a la repousse? Making tools is a big part of the work, but after a while, you'll get a good collection of them, and wont have to stop so often to make a new one. Eventually, you'll have hundreds of them, Oh my!

Choosing a simple pattern like the one you're doing may seem simple, but it can be the most difficult, because it has to be perfect, or any mistake will show up. You've done good to keep all your lines smooth and flowing. Keep up the good work.

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Hi Don, The handle is showing heaps of promise .... keep at it.

 

Some years ago a friend made a comment when looking at a piece that made a deep impression and is often overlooked or misunderstood by many.

 

The quote goes along these lines.............

 

" One must first understand the utmost complexities before one can understand the utmost simplisities!"

 

The piece he was looking at was a very simple form to look at but it did require an extrordinary amount of complex working to impart that X factor magick into a seemingly uncomplicated design.

 

It is often a temptation to over embellish a work at the cost of a potentially beautiful design which would speak louder with 'less being more'.

The skill is in the design as much as the execution!!!!!

 

Your handle is illustrating this concept and understanding perfectly.

 

Donn

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Thanks for the encouragement. After working with blades for so many years, I am drawn to simple lines and the power they have when they are done consciously. I am also well aware how difficult simple can be.

 

I think I am finished with this piece, but unfortunately I can't seem to find the right light tonight. It is frustrating me and I am tired so I will come back to it tomorrow when I am fresh.

 

The blade has an active hamon, but I can't seem to get it to pop and the handle is dying or harsh. Need to build a tent.

 

post-1-1130444060.jpg

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Hi Don,

 

It is great to see a piece completed! Nice work!

 

I played around with the background, cut out the light and replaced it with black, to illustrate the use of a darker background to brighten up the subject. I did nothing to adjust the brightness of the knife with the lighting you provided for the tan background picture. My suggestion is to use a darker background than the knife and pour a little more light into the frame. The meter might read differently and pop the knife out the way you would like to see it. I'm no pro, but Photoshop can help with the learning curve. :)

 

For example:

 

df_blackcutout.jpg

 

 

You might have to add more light from the sides, the reflection from the lighter background won't be available to contribute illumination as it might be doing in your first image, but then again, it might not be contributing that much anyway.

 

Janel

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Thanks everyone.

 

The fittings are charcoal blued iron with a shakudo spacer between the ferrule and the handle. The shakudo was gold plated and then polished off the rim and patinated purple.

 

This is the hardest knife I have ever had to photograph and still haven't gotten it right.

 

post-1-1130443875.jpg

 

This piece looks and feels a lot better than I can capture.

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WOW! What a difference with the photo! The knife is beautiful. I had the feeling that the blade was dark in the first picture. Will you be able to describe the successful set up once you get there? Take a photo of the setup perhaps?

 

I recall a long thread on Bladesmith's that was very helpful...

'Pro' photography setups-indoor, Some insights in how we do it... http://forums.dfoggknives.com/index.php?showtopic=2417

 

Isn't it great to still be learning?

 

Janel

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