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Hi every one,

 

I've made a few things lately and thought it would be nice to share them with you. First a rococo mirror frame. It's made of pear and measures 84 x 50 x 2,4 mm. Finished it with Danish Oil and a thin coat of shoe polish.

 

Another piece i've made is a so called savonarola chair. The construction and build was a real challenge as i had to figure it all out by myself. But then the fun part was decorating the steamed pear by carving. I'm most proud of the back shield as it's only 21 mm in diameter.

 

And finally a little joke; a miniature love spoon, also carved out of steamed pear. I love this type of wood, because of it's fine grain and the ease with which it is to carve. And as bonus, it's also gentle on the tools :))

 

I hope you like 'm,

Debora

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Hi Janel, thanks for your kind words. As for the steaming of pear, un-steamed it has a creme or pale brownish color. When steamed it brings out it's pinkish tones.

 

I read somewhere you are still (did i understand you right?) in doubt sometimes about how to finish? Maybe i'm wrong about that, but with each piece i wonder how to finalize it too. As you can see in the first pic, the frame was still untreated there. A bit of danish oil sealed it while enhancing it's pink colored grain wonderfully. With miniature furniture most makers turn to carranuba (carnauba) wax or other real life products. But these clog up detailed carving, and i read somewhere about using shoe polish instead. I must say, it worked a treat on the frame and gave that subtle depth and color to the deeper carvings that i was looking for. But still i wonder and ponder on what to use... Reading here helps every now and then :)

 

It also has made me think the investment in power tools is justified now. When i see what you all can do to bone and stone or even tagua nuts that are sooo hard i think i might buy me a moto tool too.

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Hi Debora,

 

You asked: "I read somewhere you are still (did i understand you right?) in doubt sometimes about how to finish?"

 

Yes you did. I still do have questions with each piece, especially the woods that I have not used before or use infrequently. Even the different boxwood sources react differently with different treatments. I enjoy the carving and then when getting close to the finishing part I have a sense of how I might like to see it when done. I then take an adjacent piece of wood from the original source, prepare the surface to the degree of smoothness, perhaps with some textures added, and then begin sampling my options. It helps to work out the questions first, and to give the different treatments time to settle in. This part of the work is often nerve wracking for me.

 

Janel

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Niky, the original is on display in the Metropolitan Museum in New York;

 

http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/150007577?rpp=20&pg=1&od=on&ft=x+chair&pos=5

 

I've never seen it myself, but researching the internet and studying pictures of variations that could be found i narrowed it down to an actual plan

 

Janel, my approach too! :) As you described, each piece needs it's own 'look' and even if it's from the same wood, like you said, the same finish might result in a different appearance due to surface treatment, size etc. It's nerve wracking to me too, cos imho carving or making piece should take up half the time you put into it. Fishing it should be the other half. Because over time I've learned a finish can make or break a piece. So yes, i'm very careful and test things out all the time too. But still, each person i ask about their approach, favorite finish, recipes etc, comes up with different answers. Which is great because it tells me there are many ways to skin a cat. But confusing too at times, especially when i'm looking for a guide or wonder into new territories. That's why the book you reviewed seems to be a great aid. I've ordered it yesterday :)

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  • 3 months later...

Hi everyone,

 

Earlier this summer I'd carved a rococo mirror, and decided to make an accompanying console table for it. This is the original.

 

 

 

 

And here the miniature version of it. Scale 1 to 12. Like the mirror, carved of steamed per with real peach marble table top.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know it is a bit out of the field of interest, with so many other type of carvers. Still hope you appreciate the fine carving.

 

With kind regards,

Debora

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 months later...

Hi everyone,

 

Perhaps you know I'm a miniaturist and love to carve and incorporate it in furniture. So I thought I'd show you a scale model I've made just before Christmas. It's a draw leaf table, or Dutch pull out table. I know, it's probably not like most of the subjects you people make, but it has some delicate carvings you might like. The melon shaped legs and the tobacco leaves on the aprons, hiding the leaf mechanism.

 

If you like to see that mechanism or more of the build, feel free to have a look on my weblog. And please, do comment if you want to, i really appreciate your look on carvings, which is somewhat different to people who make miniature reproductions. Any constructive criticism is what I crave!

 

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WoW .... And yes I am amazed at the details and the art that you do. Thanks for sharing and I will be watching for more.

I use to build, repair , and refinish furniture. Now to see it being done in miniature ,,, and done so fantastic.

I read about the waxing ,,,, what I have found is to use carnauba wax,,, the hard block,, then with a chamois wheel and a variable speed rotary tool ,,, like a foredom,, or a dremel ,,, . At high speed move the chamois on to the wax to load the edge of the wheel, then at a slower speed work the wax on to the carving ...

Again thanks for sharing ,, love your work.

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Hi Debora,

 

Your work in miniature is fascinating! Such precision and attention to the construction, and so tiny in size takes great care at patience to reach the completion of a piece. That you also build a prototype to work out the questions is admirable. Thank you for sharing, and for posting a link to your blog.

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Thank you Ed! This is the kind stuff I like so much about this forum. You have been building furniture in real life so you've got the experience. I've heard other wood workers about it too, suggesting carnauba wax as being a great finish. And I can see it work, the way you describe it!

 

But because of the work being so delicate sometimes, I've referred to the softer furniture waxes that do hold it as an ingredient. Briwax, which can be diluted with turpentine as well. Mostly because that way I'm able to apply a very thin coat, without clogging up any detailing, and that way I keep the finish in scale as well. I've done an intricately carved side table last summer with that method and used a soft tooth brush to buff up all the nooks and crannies. Worked well. A wheel would skim over I think? Besides, I'm too inexperienced with a flex shaft :? Too scared to accidentally break of or damage the surface, brrr…

 

On top of that, don't think these pieces will hardly see any wear and tear?! :D One of the best characteristics of carnauba wax, no?

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Oh the patience you must have! It is truly amazing work and to be able to hold it and work it while being so small, I am afraid my fingers would be like clubs trying to work something so small.

 

I understand your hesistance with the foredom, a small mistep and your work would be ruined. There is also the issue as you say of the sheen of the finish. The Briwax is nice to work with, especially with the colors available. I have used a number of different restoration waxes that are soft and you can always color them by adding artist oils. Waxes are highly underrated.

 

Looking forward to seeing more of your work.

 

Mark

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  • 3 weeks later...

I love the pieces. Well done.

 

I thought I would mention the steaming with the pear, not only does it change the color it also changes the grain. It makes it feel more dense having first raised the grain then contracting it as it cools and dries. In some ways it is the same wetting the carving raises the grain, so does the steaming though I have to think it causes contract to a smoother texture and denser over all in the end.

 

I have used some streamed Swiss pear for a relief carving and it is really quite fantastic, hard, dense, and finishes very well.

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  • 1 month later...

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