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Geometric Ball In Tigerwood


Stephen R.

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Here is a piece I just finished and am sending off with my daughter to Germany as a gift for her exchange family.

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From a single piece of wood, It is three levels deep with each level cut free to be independent of the others.

 

I will add some other carvings soon.

 

This is made of Tigerwood and I would love to know if anyone knows if it is related to one of the iron wood families as it is super dense wood similar in feel to some American Ironwood carvings I have made.

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Stephen ,,good looking Geometric Ball. With the talent to make the ball that good looking ,,, the other carvings have got to be good.

What size is the ball?,,, and would you be willing to share how you did the carving.

Did a quick search.

www.wood-database.com/lumber-identification/hardwoods/goncalo-alves/

Comments: Goncalo Alves is commonly referred to as “Tigerwood” or “Brazilian Tigerwood” .

 

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Thanks for the kind comments.

 

I originaly designed the piece in a 3d program after sketching out some ideas on paper.

 

The ball is roughly 4 inches. I have some Tigerwood that I was given. It is basically a 4.5 x 4.5 inch post. I cut to a cube. Then took the corners off to create the basic octogon ball. Then I used a stationary disc sander to take off more corners till I got the blank ready. I then drilled out the outer cage. After smoothing the next layer a bit I laid out the inner cage and wasted the stock by drill in the areas I could access. It is rather tough to get the right angle and depth and that caused some problems. I then moved to the hand tools as access isn't really possible with power tools. Once you get the basic shapes to the outer cages I then move to the inner ball. All the pieces have to remain attached since with these smaller carvings you can't hold the pieces in order to carve them. Once they are separated the shape is almost set particularly on the inner most level.

 

This piece in the end was hampered by the hardness of the Tigerwood. I broke three tips in the wood. Really tough stuff. Almost as hard a the Ironwood I have use for smaller carvings like crosses but never this complex so it was tough. I couldn't thin the layers as much as I wanted due to the same problem so the layers are thicker than I usualy like to produce. I will post some of my other balls soon.

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