Jump to content

New pin


Jim Kelso

Recommended Posts

I liked making the Maidenhair Fern so much I've recycled the design in another incarnation. A pierced and engraved shakudo pin with gold bezel and inlayed reed, and copper with gold butterfly.

 

I'm off tomorrow for Crafts At the Castle(Hynes Convention Center-Boston). Come see me this Friday-Sunday if you live near Boston. I'll probably post some in-process shots of this upon return.

post-4-1133306446.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Jim,

 

I like and appreciate what you`ve done. You`ve taken a pretty conventional or formal fan format and utilised/ worked within those constraints very successfully.

I sense a pleasant tension between the two opposing curves on the left, defined by the edge of the fan`s outer edge and the ferns delicate leaves. The butterfly`s shape again echos similar curves, and it`s position suggests a sensitive awareness of the tensions created by the surrounding elements. i enjoyed the way the right hand side of the fern drapes over toward the outer edge of the frame but to be absolutely honest , I feel the single blade of "reed" is superflous, in fact i feel it detracts from an otherwise reasonably pleasing composition.

 

I look forward to more detailed images

 

regards,

 

Ford :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I liked making the Maidenhair Fern so much I've recycled the design in another incarnation. A pierced and engraved shakudo pin with gold bezel and inlayed reed, and copper with gold butterfly.

 

I'm off tomorrow for Crafts At the Castle(Hynes Convention Center-Boston). Come see me this Friday-Sunday if you live near Boston. I'll probably post some in-process shots of this upon return.

 

Have a pleasant trip Jim :lol:

 

Best Regards,

 

dagistanli.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim,

 

I like  and appreciate what you`ve done. You`ve taken a pretty conventional or formal fan format and utilised/ worked within those constraints very successfully.

I sense a pleasant tension between the two opposing curves on the left, defined by the edge of the fan`s outer edge and the ferns delicate leaves. The butterfly`s shape again echos similar curves, and it`s position suggests a sensitive awareness of the tensions created by the surrounding elements. i enjoyed the way the right hand side of the fern drapes over toward the outer edge of the frame but to be absolutely honest ( as I`ve tried to be thus far ), I feel the single blade of "reed" is superflous, in fact i feel it detracts from an otherwise very pleasing composition.

 

I look forward to more detailed images and have no doubt that by Sunday night some lucky induvidual will be enjoying  ( quite rightly ) what i consider one of your most accomplished offerings.

 

best regards,

 

Ford :lol:

 

Hi Ford,

 

I think he ment to balance the composition by adding that golden reed in opposition to the butterfly on the left, am I wrong?

 

Best Regards,

 

dagistanli.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Hi there Dagistanli,

 

i`m sure that when Jim gets back from his show, next monday, i believe, he`ll be able to tell us more about this piece.

 

I think, however, that you may be right when you suggest the reed is intended to balance the composition, Jim has also indicated that he felt it led the eye back to the butterfly.

 

We all view a work of art or craft through our own unique set of personal aesthetic criteria. For myself, the design and materials immediately suggested a Japanese influence, the fan shape is a fairly common format in painting, for instance. I would argue that when western artists first came into contact with Japanese art in any significant way, beginning in the late 19th century, the twin concepts of asymmetry and negative space were the most influential. If you think of western art until that time it is very much concerned with compositional balance but rarely allows for the development of deliberate imbalance and the use of empty space to emphasise this.

 

My opinion is that as the piece is strongly reminisent of Japanese design the placement of the "offending" :lol: reed or blade of grass defies this specific aesthetic.

 

this is of course merely my opinion,

 

as always, Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim, Ford and Dagistanli merhaba to you all,

 

My brutish European eyes seem to swith between seeing the symmetry and the asymmetry as a better solution. I can see what Jim means by 'pulls the eyes back into the composition' and what Ford means by purposeful imbalance.

The trick is I can't seem to decide which I prefer. I tend to lean towards imbalance (watch it now :) ), but I really like the composition on this pin. The Oriental forms and themes work well with a 'more Western' composition.

 

Does this all make sense?

My doc has forbidden me to talk about balance :lol:

 

-t :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there Dagistanli,

 

i`m sure that when Jim gets back from his show, next monday, i believe, he`ll be able to tell us more about this piece.

 

I think, however, that you may be right when you suggest the reed is intended to balance the composition, Jim has also indicated to me that he felt it led the eye back to the butterfly.

 

We all view a work of art or craft through our own unique set of personal aesthetic criteria. For myself, the design and materials immediately suggested a Japanese influence, the fan shape is a fairly common format in painting, for instance. I would argue that when western artists first came into contact with Japanese art in any significant way, beginning in the late 19th century, the twin concepts of asymmetry and negative space were the most influential. If you think of western art until that time it is very much concerned with compositional balance but rarely allows for the development of deliberate imbalance and the use of empty space to emphasise this.

 

My opinion is that as the piece is strongly reminisent of Japanese design the placement of the "offending" :)  reed or blade of grass defies this specific aesthetic.

 

this is of course merely my opinion, I have been known to be wrong before :lol:

 

as always, Ford

 

Hi Ford,

 

You know what, I really do enjoy your posts, and I wouldn't dare say you have been wrong! It's just a matter of difference in opinion as it should be.

 

Now, the developement of Turkish decorative arts have been influenced by four main elements. The first influence stems from Central Asia and the Far East. The artistic influence of the Uyghurs, the Huns and the Chinese. The source of many ornaments and designs could be found in Uyghur foundings. I'm not going in to details as to what the other three elements are, but The Ottomans have developed their own rules of composition in their decorative arts, and now after the evolution of The Turkish Republic, naturaly, we follow almost the same rules in our designs except with the addition of more influences, different interpretations, and with a more modernistic point of view. What I'm trying to say is, usualy, the artists do not follow the exact rules of composition of where they have been inspired from. They have their own interpretations, unless the artist claims that he is following such and such, then it's a different matter.

 

I am sure in the future, you will develope some thing which will reminence Japanese art, but it will be with purely British interpretation :P I certainly would love to see that, it looks like it's going towards that way to me!

 

In Jims example, it may strongly reminisent of Japanese design, but again it's still his own interpretation. Now, if I were to design the same piece, I would probably place a Chinese influenced Ottoman Dragon in place of the fern and go on from there, but again it wouldn't have been Jim's, it would be mine :) Then you would probably call it a mess :( right?

 

By the way, I am totally ignorant regarding Japanese art, and would like to know it's main differences from the Chinese art. It looks quite the same to me :(

 

Well, sorry to bore you with all that, but I did like the pin, and enjoyed it. It's been very beneficial talking over it :)

 

Best Regards,

 

dagistanli.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim, Ford and Dagistanli merhaba to you all,

 

My brutish European eyes seem to swith between seeing the symmetry and the asymmetry as a better solution. I can see what Jim means by 'pulls the eyes back into the composition' and what Ford means by purposeful imbalance.

The trick is I can't seem to decide which I prefer. I tend to lean towards imbalance (watch it now  :) ), but I really like the composition on this pin. The Oriental forms and themes work well with a 'more Western' composition.

 

Does this all make sense?

My doc has forbidden me to talk about balance  :lol:

 

-t  :P

 

Merhaba Toscano,

 

"Does this all make sense?" Yesss, it does to me! Actually, I second all of what you've said regarding the pin :( I too liked Jim's composition, but Ford has approached to the design from a more technichal, and a Japanese Art, point of view of which I'm not familiar with. Regarding the Japanese purposeful imbalance technique, how it's applied, and how it can be detected on a piece of art is some thing for me to study.

 

 

Best Regards,

 

 

dagistanli

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Hi there Dagistanli,

 

as you say, we`re only offering opinions, and you can suggest I`m wrong, I can take it :)

 

The point you make is very valid, about contemporary artists not having to totally "obay" the rules that dominate the areas that they draw inspiration from.

 

I suppose that ultimately it is up to the individual artist to decide on how they will attempt to express their own particular aesthetic. It is then up to the individual viewer to decide if they feel the artist has succeeded and if the work "speaks" to them.

 

As for my own work oneday expressing something British, I hope not, :lol: I grew up in South Africa and will be returning home in January. :( I find my own easthetic ( oops, interesting slip! ) somewhere between Europe, South Africa and Japan. African Zen, perhaps :P

 

regards, as always,

 

Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It may be an American perspective, but my sense is that there is a universal culture created by working with the same materials and tools. I appreciate early work on many levels and look for things that work. Style however, can be so identifiable that when the work wanders close to a strong style it is labeled or compared.

 

I run into this a lot. Adding hamon to my blades brings criticism from all corners. It is as if we are never suppose to pick up a beautiful thread because it was once done or if we do, then we must use it in a traditional manner.

 

It is natural to be drawn to an aethetic or easthetic that resonates with you. But are we then limited to reproduction or can we find our own understanding and expression.

 

Jim's work in the broach is a perfect example of a modern and emerging style. His eye is sensitive to composition and with a casual placement the whole story is told. What a wonderful piece!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because of our position in the history of civilization, we are given the means to know many disciplines in the world of craft, art and creativity. Individuals who choose to embrace a dedicated, historically unique, discipline face great challenges to keeping their path pure to the ideals of their predecessors.

 

In this contemporary world of globally shared information, through libraries, museums, educational opportunities, traveling artists and the internet, there is much to be stimulated by. It is human nature to observe, learn from, translate and use what might inspire.

 

Our experiences, training, how we choose to proceed with creating new work influenced by the unique melding of knowledge each of us has gained, challenges us each time we begin to form a concept for a new piece. The choices we face, how to balance our individual histories with our creative minds, is a grand challenge.

 

It is a wonder that any artist can even begin their journey, but human nature again compels us, to move forward, to learn, to explore ideas, and to create. We move through our creative lives one choice, one piece, one experience at a time.

 

We are so fortunate to live in a time where access to knowledge is so much easier than at any time before. Is that also a detriment to the creative mind? We are constantly forcing choices to be made from a multitude of influences.

 

Preservation of the historically unique, such as the determination which few contemporary artists have been trained for, is a remarkable choice for any contemporary person to make. Such training must focus choices in a way which others may never experience.

 

What a time to be alive, what an opportunity to be creative!

 

Janel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're so right Janel. We live in amazing times. The down side of it is that cultural heritages are disapearing and being replaced by that Mcdonaldisation (is that a word?) of everything. We stand to lose our uniqueness. But it also affords artists with more oportunities than ever before. The choices are sometimes daunting.

Personally, I use all kinds of sources for inspiration in my work. The world is our oyster.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yikes!! All this over a little gold reed.

 

I have to agree with Don and others that I believe we are part of a "universal culture" , if I take their meaning correctly. Certainly I have been influenced by Japanese art, but more and more I seek to express a more universal/personal expression with Nature(capitolN) as the teacher, not bound by formulaic principles. To a large extent, I think I've paid my dues in the "studious" pursuit of technique and aesthetics. It's not that there isn't always something to learn in those regards, but if one is to be an expressive artist, there is a point where you have to go out on the limb a bit.

 

Perhaps universal/personal sounds paradoxical and perhaps it is. I'm comfortable with that. I think we all express both the universal and the personal.

 

Part of my intent with the reed was to add a spatial element suggestive of being in the garden. As far as the composition in 2 dimensions, I was more aiming to keep the eye moving rather than balance it in a "weight" sense.

As people and artists we are always learning. In one sense everything we do is "correct" and in another, nothing is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very beautiful piece, Jim!

 

I am looking and I don't feel just small dissonance! Accomplished work! Very good!

 

I think that the little gold reed is a very essential element! Without this element the project will be absolutely bad! ;)

 

Just my thoughts...

 

S

 

___________

 

PS. It's possible to see back side??

 

_________________

Addition:

 

Oh my English! :) I wanted to say "the reverse".

Ford, thanks for comment! B)

 

S

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

___________

 

PS. It's possible to see back side??

 

Hi there Sergei,

 

I don`t think Jim will show us his back side, now matter how nice you are about his piece. :);)B)

 

Do svidanye,

 

Ford B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Jim,

 

 

 

Would you elaborate on the details of the universal/personal message you are seeking to express through your work?  What principles do you set forth for yourself in choosing your own personal aesthetic?  What is a formulaic principle and what is not?  Would you also speak more about your background/training and how you have arrived at melding European & Japanese traditions?  I doubt I'll ever get a chance to study in Japan (despite the fact that my brother has lived there for close to 15 yrs) and being as I reside in the great white north up here (snowing heavily as I write); I don't have the same opportunities available to me. 

 

I'm curious as to whether there is a middle ground, or spectrum of choices in there somewhere between, as you say, "As people and artists we are always learning. In one sense everything we do is "correct" and in another, nothing is."?  I'm not keen on an either/or approach with regard to my work, or life for that matter. :)

 

Kathleen

 

Thanks for your feedback Kathleen.

 

I'm seeking to convey the power and beauty of Nature filtered through the human perspective.

I think so many of our problems are the result of a progressively serious disconnect from nature and our tendency to fear it and desire to dominate it. I hope that my work might inspire someone to take a closer look at the natural world and perhaps feel more open to it.

 

A formulaic principle might be something like requiring a certain percentage of empty space or demanding that blue never be used with green. There are, I'm sure, certain of these things that are useful, especially in the beginning, but at some point it has to be seen that rules are at the service of us, not the other way around. I don't know that I have any principles other than to try to get out of the way of the expression that is flowing abundantly every moment.

 

My path of learning/training in art and craft started in 1971 in earnest. Since I was a child, I have enjoyed making things, but in that year I decided I wanted to make a vocation of craft. I enroled in a boatbuilding school in Seattle where I learned the rudiments of woodworking. I learned from that experience that I had an aptitude for tool use and design and if something interested me, I could find out how it was done, either through books or visiting some accomplished person. This is the core of my learning philosophy. There have been wonderful artists both East and West and we all have some huge shoulders to ride on. I just mostly like to look and absorb.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Greetings all,

 

I thought the following quote interesting in that it seems to echo the sentiment that Jim was expressing in response to Kathleens query,

 

"Where I called on to define, very briefly, the term art, I should call it `the reproduction of what the senses percieve in Nature, through the veil of the soul`. The mere imitation, however accurate, of what is Nature, entitles no man to the sacred name of Artist." quoth Edgar Allen Poe

 

another quote which expresses a related view,

 

"While I recognise the necessity for a basis of observed reality....true art lies in a reality that is felt." Odilon Redon

 

just adding to the pot,

 

as always, Ford :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Jim,

 

 

I'm curious as to whether there is a middle ground, or spectrum of choices in there somewhere between, as you say, "As people and artists we are always learning. In one sense everything we do is "correct" and in another, nothing is."?  I'm not keen on an either/or approach with regard to my work, or life for that matter. :)

 

Kathleen

 

I don't see it at all as having to make a choice. It's more a matter of angle of vision. Of course we make choices and must, but I believe every choice we make, even if seemingly a mistake, is the right one and will by the graceful nature of the universe be useful in our progress. In this context, there is no correct or incorrect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...