Jump to content

New pin


Jim Kelso

Recommended Posts

Guest ford hallam
I believe every choice we make, even if seemingly a mistake, is the right one and will by the graceful nature of the universe be useful in our progress.

 

You make an interesting point Jim, biologists tell us that the evolution of all nature is a procession of genetic errors, those that are useful are perpetuated simply because they add a benifit or advantage to the continuation of the life form in question. Those errors that don`t "work" are destined for extinction. This is what "survival of the fittest" means.

 

I don`t see the universe as graceful in relation to us at all, it appears rather more indifferent to me. Taoism recognises this point well, which is why it advocates attuning one`s life to that wisdom. If you try to ignore the "rules" of the universe, for instance by leaping off a cliff and attempting to fly, the resultant lesson is unequivical, the "universe" will kill you. ;)

 

I reckon that all the various points that this thread has raised could be discussed ad infinitum, and perhaps deserve to be. We could go for the longest running thread on the internet. :)

 

Personally, I`m finding everyones responses and additions facinating,

 

respectful regards to all,

Ford B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I certainly believe in a spectrum of choices; although, if I were to focus too much on whether the choice is a mistake or is the right one (which, to me implies a black/white, or right/wrong choice), I'd most likely stagnate from inaction.  It's difficult for me to ascertain where you're coming from. On the one hand you allude to choices being right/wrong, correct/incorrect (which only allows two options, in reality there are many more than two) and on the other hand suggest that by the graceful nature of the universe the choice will be neither correct nor incorrect.  If I may apply your reasoning in relation to the piece of work you've posted here (still waiting for close up pics ;) ), I would suggest that the reed element is neither correct nor incorrect in this context; but, is useful to your purpose.  Being that this is true in the context of what you are saying, it is then possible to suggest that the reed element may not be a necessary, nor 'correct' element, is it not?  :)

 

Kathleen

 

I think Rumi will put it better than I.

 

"Out beyond ideas

 

of right doing and

 

wrong doing,

 

there lies a field.

 

...I'll meet you there."

 

Actually, it's occuring to me that the forum is not my personal best choice for having a discussion of such a personal and difficult to verbalize issue. This is a personal preference and is not meant as a reflection on what anyone else might find meaningful.

 

As concerns the reed, I think I've heard and appreciated everyone's input and will consider them as time goes on.

 

Thank you. Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Jim,

 

 

 

I'm still not clear on the merging of east/west that you spoke about previously with regard to your work.  What opportunities did you have to study Japanese art, how did you access those opportunities, and what do you feel you have brought from those specific experiences to your own work?  Thank you for indulging my curiousity.  I appreciate the opportunity to learn that it affords me.  :D  :P

 

Kathleen

 

I received two fellowships to study informally in Japan in 1988 and 1997. These opportunities were a chance to explore netsuke making and metalwork in the earlier visit and a more focused exploration of metalwork in the latter. Mostly these trips were focused on technique, but I looked at a lot of art of many kinds as I had been doing already for many years. I don't know that I could easily sum up a synopsis of merging East and West. There are qualities that can be pointed out that are prominent in Japanese art, but you could find them in Rembrandt and others as well. I look for what moves me, and that's usually pretty hard to describe in general terms. I don't mean to be evasive, but these things are hard to sum up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Dick.

 

As promised, here is the backside. Perhaps not as exciting as you all had hoped for. The pin, joint and catch are manufactured items. The plate they are soldered to is a piece of Phil Baldwin's 22k/Sterling bimetal which is then pinned with a dew drop coming from the front and a pin that is soldered to the back of the butterfly. The bezel wire is a standard Hoover & Strong step bezel wire in 18k.

post-4-1134235947.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

.

There are qualities that can be pointed out that are prominent in Japanese art, but you could find them in Rembrandt and others as well.

 

Hi Jim,

 

I was just catching up with some of the thoughts you`ve taken time to share with us and I find myself repeatedly drawn to the statement above. I`ve been mulling it over for a little while and wondered if you`d care to elaborate a wee bit, just to give us an idea of the sort of things you are picking up on.

 

thanks, Ford :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Ford,

 

Here are a couple of paintings by Rembrandt. Sorry about the quality, but they've gotten a bit musty in my attic. :P

 

Anyway, they show some similarities to my eye to Japanese work in the use of empty space, somber, astingent tones, and poignant mood.

 

Sorry about the size of the smaller one(Rest on Flight Into Egypt). It's reminiscent to me of Japanese landscapes with small figures that were done earlier in China.

post-4-1134263968.jpg

post-4-1134263990.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim- I think Rembrandt is a great choice to explain your point... Made me think of Tanizaki's "In Praise of Shadows". Rembrandt also used Japanese washi (paper) for many of his prints...

 

btw if you need those drawings cleaned, you can send them to me- insurance to get them to Ford in the UK will cost way too much. ^_^

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...