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Use of computer with digital photography


Janel

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Tassos pushed my interest button and I thought that we should make this a new topic, and quit straying from the hammered metal vessel topic where this thread got started...

 

"Some digital cameras will get their juice from the computer if they are connected via USB. You can also take pictures THROUGH the computer thus allowing a bigger preview. -t"

 

Tell me more about this Tassos! What platform, PC/Mac do you know and how does it work?

 

Janel

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Janel,

 

I know that with Windows XP you can take a picture with your digital camera when they are connected via USB. In the Scanner and Camera Wizard it gives you the option to take a picture (click on a button or press CTRL+T).

This particular one does not give you a preview of the picture, though, depending on the camera model you can still use the little monitor in the back. The beauty is that the camera takes its juice from the USB. No worry about running out just in the middle of that important photoshoot.

 

Now I know there are programmes that allow you better control of this (e.g. give you a preview etc) but I don't remember what the one I have in mind is called. I will try to get hold of it if I can and will let you know.

 

As for Mac users (as I know you are Janel) I have little wisdom other than "invest on a PC" ^_^

I will take a look online for programmes that run on infidel Macs too.

 

Cheerio f'now

-t

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Nikon Capture will let you control the camera through the computer, but I think it is designed to run on Nikon DSLR's.

 

I use to use the video out to a small TV for setting up pictures. Ideally you have a spare laptop that can be devoted to the camera. I have thought of getting a used one for that purpose.

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Janel,

Try as I may, I have not been able to track down a better programme than the Nikon or the Breezesys one. I have had even less luck finding something for Macintosh I am afraid. The only other promising lead I had was with digital video cameras. if you have one of those you can apparently do this a lot more easily it seems (theoretically). You can sort of set it up as a 'webcam' and snap away to your heart's delight.

 

Sorry about the not-so-promising-after-all tip.

 

-t

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Please don't waste time for this, unless you are seeking to learn for yourselves as well! I thank you for the efforts so far! I do have Image Capture for the Mac and use it with the scanner. It may be that it could also receive the images from the camera if I have the right cable to connect the camera and computer.

 

http://www.steves-digicams.com/

 

I'm going to have a look at the above site. I've found good information there. Jim, todays picture of the day on Steves Digicams is a beauty, one that you might appreciate. Off to do my own research.

 

Janel

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  • 1 month later...

gang,

I thought I would add a little bit more information I just dug up, though it will unfortunately be of no help to Janel (at least for now, seeing as it seems to work with Windows only). It appears that one of the newest developments in digital cameras (new for me at least) is to make them wifi enabled. They can wirelessly communicate with other devices such as printers and computers. Of particular interest is this Canon model SD430 which is wifi-enabled (without the need for added cards) and with Canon's RemoteCapture software can be controlled wirelessly from your computer. No need to fumble around with cables etc AND you have a much nicer viewfinder, i.e. your monitor. I love all this new technology stuff :o

Anyway, I hope this is useful to someone.

 

Cheers

-t

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I should also add that most Canon digital cameras have this remote capture ability when connected to the computer, either in 'traditional' means (USB or firewire cable) or over the ether (wifi). For this to work all you need is to download a little programme from Canon called Remote Capture which is available for both Windows and Mac users. It's free and it works :o

I have just installed it myself and it seems pretty nice.

The downloads can be found here (for both Windows and Macs - scroll down to find it)

 

-t

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  • 1 year later...

just came across this thread. I am upgrading my photo system. Hoping to justify a Mac laptop.

I have a Nikon camera and am looking for the same ability to photograph in my studio, download to laptop to view and have the ability to make adjustments before sending finished work out.

Did anyone find a program for the Mac system? Would appreciate your help.

 

Mark

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I watched a pro photographer use LightRoom, a new program. He was using a Mac. I don't know if you need additional software that is aimed at the camera, or if LightRoom is all you need. It also is a photo editing and photo file organizer. Ford watched the same demonstration.

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Guest ford hallam

Adobe's new lightroom photo editing software is available in both windows and mac format. If you want to shoot directly to a laptop and into such a program you'll need a camera with a remote operating function and it's associated software.

 

I've recently completely overhauled my photography set up. I'm using the Canon 400D with a Canon EF-S 60mm F2.8~F32 macro lens, it should be noted that the inbuilt "macro" lens that is often part of digital cameras lens arrangements is not really a true macro lens at all and certainly the results are worlds apart too. I'm shooting tethered ( via a USB cable ) to my laptop. There is remote shooting software that comes with the camera but it is a little basic. The system produced by Breeze system specifically for this camera is lovely and very easy to use. I focus manually and do everything also on the laptop, the camera is on a tripod. It's taught me more in 2 months than I'd learned in years. You get practically instant feedback and can play around with an almost infinite degree of control with all the various settings being so much easier to adjust. With a SLR (single lens reflex digital camera, not the standard digital jobs.) you generally also have the option to shoot in RAW, this means the captured image has so much more information which you can adjust after the shoot.

 

I love good tools and this piece of kit is giving me a great deal of satisfaction. At the moment I'm still using my old paint shop pro to do most of my editing, the only reason I've not yet bought the adobe lightroom is that I can't find a way to buy it at US prices, yet....I'll give it a go again tomorrow.

 

regards, Ford

 

hey Toscano,

I've just noticed your comment about being able to shoot without wires, via the laptop, aaargh! :) now I've got to get that too........ :)

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I'm hoping to go to the SLR soon so am following all this with great interest. I did some hunting and for Mac users looking for tethered shooting, the standard seems to be Capture One, which also offers interesting editing/workflow functions. There are two versions, and it's also for Windows. The Pro at $499. seems out of reach for most, but the LE(30 day free trial) is $80. from B&H. You need to make sure that it works with your camera. 30 day trial seems a great way to check that, but there is a list of compatible cameras as well. Their website is a little inscrutable and some of the flash functions didn't work for me. Maybe it's my browser. For a look at the user interface go to "support" and click "tutorials".

 

Phase One Capture One

 

There is also something called Bibble which I will look into further.

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