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Lighting


Ed Twilbeck

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I would like to know what type lights do you use? My work area for now is a small room, no windows, and my lights are a 100 watt bulb on the ceiling, and a 100 watt reveal bulb on a clamp type lamp. I need better lighting, any ideas? Most of the time I try to work out side in the sunshine, where it is always good lighting. When I had my studio I had plenty of lights and a lot of natural lighting.Firewood Studio

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Hi, I used to use regular light bulbs, but the heat from them was close to my face and hands, since I keep the very near my hands and head while carving the little pieces. I call the lfixture an elbow lamp. The end that is not the light end is held in place in a hole drilled into the old desk that makes up part of my carving space. Another hole is in the dust collector to hold a lamp such as this, and currently I am trying that position for the lamp.

 

My bulb choice now is the tornado style florescent bulb, and have recently used a daylight spectrum or daylight simulation spectrum. It seems like a cool light, but all the colors seem to be well represented. Sorry, I cannot be more specific. The florescent bulb is less warming on the face, hands and wood. That may or may not be an issue with your work.

 

Janel

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Hi. Lighting is very important. I worked in a jewelry factory for 17 years, and we always used three-bulb flourescent lamps. Now that I work in my own shop, I use the same type of lamp. It's made by Dazor, and the bulbs are eighteen inches long. The three-bulb lamps work the best. They stay cool, which for me is important, as I usually rest the lamp right against my forhead when I'm working. I also have a second lamp which shines over my left shoulder. You almost can't have too much light (especially as you get older :))

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