Jump to content

metal clasp


Doug Sanders

Recommended Posts

sorry- credit where it's due... http://www.mfa.org/collections/index.asp

-that'll bring you to the search page. For the image, I just searched under the term 'kanamono', I think it comes up on the first page returned.

 

Here's another from the MFA collection- I really like the vitality and the incised work on the feathers- not mechanical and repetitive. Poor thing's suffered from some overzealous cleaning though.

 

post-10-1137169577.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ooh- that's a nice one. I like the flat tone of the metal. Not too fussy of a composition either...

Seeing that reminds me of something I've wondered for ages. On tsuba, around the hole that received the blade (I can't remember the term :P ) there are often chips; most of the time of a circular nature. On this particular tsuba, it looks like they've been filled in or mended with a different alloy.

 

What is this caused by? Something tells me it was that the 'hole' had to be modified slightly to receive a sword when the time came to marry the two parts. Why does it always look like damage? On tsuba where this isn't seen, does it mean that it was never mounted with a blade?

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doug,

Thank you for showing us that pouch clasp. That is a beautiful piece. The book "Lethal Elegance" also has some great clasps. Many of the Japanese tobacco pouches have wonderful metal work on the clasps and netsuke produced buy the same craftsmen who created the sword furniture. The metalwork on pouches was the equivalent to our expensive watches.

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ooh- that's a nice one. I like the flat tone of the metal. Not too fussy of a composition either...

Seeing that reminds me of something I've wondered for ages.  On tsuba, around the hole that received the blade (I can't remember the term :P ) there are often chips; most of the time of a circular nature.  On this particular tsuba, it looks like they've been filled in or mended with a different alloy.

 

What is this caused by? Something tells me it was that the 'hole' had to be modified slightly to receive a sword when the time came to marry the two parts. Why does it always look like damage? On tsuba where this isn't seen, does it mean that it was never mounted with a blade?

:)

 

Doug, your hunch is right. The little bits of soft metal(usually copper, gold or silver) are called seki-gane. They're forged into the tang hole(nakago-hitsu) to fit the tang(nakago) of whatever sword blade the tsuba is receiving. They will vary in appearance from pristine to battle-worn depending on the tsuba history. I've seen tsuba that I doubt were intended to be mounted with them. My hunch is that some were added just as an aesthetic choice . To my eye, tsuba without them such as the goose piece, seem lacking in the nakago-hitsu area. Ford probably has some further details to add.

 

Often you will see deep punching in the corners of the nakago-hitsu(often with a * shape punch) to alter the hole for the same reason.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish I could take credit for the photo & sizing. It's straight off the MFA site. Would like to know how they get that quality in 59k.

 

Here's a kojiri(scabbard tip) in shibuichi(notice grain) with silver inlay and katakiri bori.(chiseling in imitation of brush-stroke ink painting). 3.6cm tall (28 kb)

post-4-1137273938.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim- that katana mounting is breathtaking! I can certainly see why you like it. I think the imagery works extremely well with the martial aspects of the sword. The second one of the kojiri is beautiful too- maybe a bit too feminine though for a sword mounting in my taste :)

 

Question: with mounting, were there specialists who would combine all the furniture with the blade, and saya (sheath) etc? Or would the blade smith be calling all the shots? Or the patron himself?

 

With absolutely no technical knowledge to go by, it does look like the snowflake tsuba has a cast and then stamped appearance.

I really like the splattered kozuka opening on it(I hope that is the use..)

 

p.s. the catalog for the Lethal Elegance show is now around $38 for used copies online. Maybe I'll splash out and get it. Something to drool over when the Midwest wind keeps me indoors...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Question: with mounting, were there specialists who would combine all the furniture with the blade, and saya (sheath) etc?  Or would the blade smith be calling all the shots?  Or the patron himself?

 

With absolutely no technical knowledge to go by, it does look like the snowflake tsuba has a cast and then stamped appearance.

I really like the splattered kozuka opening on it(I hope that is the use..)

 

 

Doug, making an educated guess, in the case of that katana, Natsuo was making most if not all the decisions. In general I think it probably worked out all kinds of ways depending on the various craftsmen's stature, the social status of all the parties, etc. Ford may have some info here.

 

Ford, are you there? South Africa?

 

The iron tsuba of quality were never cast as far as I know. All the texture is manipulated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...