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EQUIPTMENT--NEW OR USED??


chuck bennett

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HELLO JIM K. I enjoyed looking in on the AIRGRAVER SITE. The kicker is I do not have any idea, how I will be on engraving. I am wanting to do simple engraving on spurs and maybe cowboy type work on my knives. I have done a little with hand gravers and am not impressed with what I have done. I had a hard time keeping the graver moving. I hate to lay out a bunch of money, to start with. If I knew I would eventially be able to do decent work, I would not not mind the cost of new equiptment.

 

Chuck Bennett

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Without knowing it's condition, it's hard to say, but that's about half of a new one so seems like in the ball-park. Have you seen the Lindsay tools?

 

Lindsay Engraving Tools

 

Lindsay was my first choice when I was in the market for a unit. Unfortunatly Lindsay was taking a break from manufacture at the time and couldn't help me. I ended up forking out the $$ for a Graver Max since I knew I would be in this for the long run. I am very happy with it, but I still wonder about the lindsay. They just seem like a very elegant design being self contained like they are.

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I got a chance to see one of the Lindsay engravers while at a show in Reno recently. It is an elegant piece of machinery. The unit I saw was being run from a small CO2 cylinder that an engraver was wearing on his belt so it was totally portable.

 

The speed and stroke are controlled from the ferrule on the unit and was very subtle. The handpiece fits comfortably in the hand and seemed a more natural way to hold the graver.

 

I am just beginning with the carving and engraving, but this is the unit I am going to save for. It reminded me of those incredible minature steam engines, pure function and almost magical machinist's skill. I know it would be a joy to use.

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I've had my GraverMax for about 15 years and it's still going strong, so I can't complain about it.

Knowing Steve though, I'm itching to try his out. I do wonder if it would have the highest power that I sometimes like from the Max. I know he has two versions. I'll have to ask him.

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I got a chance to see one of the Lindsay engravers while at a show in Reno recently. It is an elegant piece of machinery. The unit I saw was being run from a small CO2 cylinder that an engraver was wearing on his belt so it was totally portable.

 

The speed and stroke are controlled from the ferrule on the unit and was very subtle. The handpiece fits comfortably in the hand and seemed a more natural way to hold the graver.

 

I am just beginning with the carving and engraving, but this is the unit I am going to save for. It reminded me of those incredible minature steam engines, pure function and almost magical machinist's skill. I know it would be a joy to use.

 

Did he have a ball vice sitting on a cigarette tray and parade up and down the rows saying "get your engraving here". :)

Seriously though that is rather neat. I was impressed with the tool without ever having handled it. Perhaps when my engraving skills are good enough i will still try to pic one up for finer work. In the mean time My GraverMax is pretty versitile. I have 901QC and a large impact hand piece which serve me well so far. I have the newer ultra high speed rotarty tool running off the variable air supply(nice tool btw) So the machine and its attachments cover allot of "ground" hehe.

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I've had my GraverMax for about 15 years and it's still going strong, so I can't complain about it.

Knowing Steve though, I'm itching to try his out. I do wonder if it would have the highest power that I sometimes like from the Max. I know he has two versions. I'll have to ask him.

 

I was wondering about power aswell. I told him I do allot of deep gougeing in steel and ask how the unit would do at that. I did not expect him to expiriment and take pictures to send to me. Very nice fellow. He made some pretty deep gouges on par with my 901 (with the heavy spring installed).

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  • 2 months later...
Guest DFogg

When I first got mine, I ran it out of oil or nearly and didn't know what to use so I called GRS. They sell the oil for the machine, but told me what to use instead. I think it was transmission fluid, will have to go to the shop to check though...getting old. Anyway the point is that they were very helpful and even offered some advice on maintainence of the old machine. That kind of support and help has cemented the deal for me and when I do upgrade, I will be going to them for my next machine.

 

Still want the Lindsay too, but the Gravermax has such a good reputation as a workhorse and with the rotary combination would be hard to beat.

 

My question is about sharpening. I built myself a rotary diamond hone using a really slow gear motor out of a surplus dialysis machine. What is the opinion on the jig that GRS sells?

 

What are the most useful graver shapes? I will be doing more carving and inlay than engraving.

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When I first got mine, I ran it out of oil or nearly and didn't know what to use so I called GRS. They sell the oil for the machine, but told me what to use instead. I think it was transmission fluid, will have to go to the shop to check though...getting old. Anyway the point is that they were very helpful and even offered some advice on maintainence of the old machine. That kind of support and help has cemented the deal for me and when I do upgrade, I will be going to them for my next machine.

 

Still want the Lindsay too, but the Gravermax has such a good reputation as a workhorse and with the rotary combination would be hard to beat.

 

My question is about sharpening. I built myself a rotary diamond hone using a really slow gear motor out of a surplus dialysis machine. What is the opinion on the jig that GRS sells?

 

What are the most useful graver shapes? I will be doing more carving and inlay than engraving.

 

Thats good advice Don. The folks at GRS are extremely helpful. It would be good to contact them in regards to the oil thing. My Graver Max came with instructions to never oil the machine and to filter any oil from the air line.

The gravers I use are Flat, diamond, knife, Lozenge, Round, modified bull nose(roundish) I also have a variety of planishing and textureing tools I use in the same hand piece. Most of the tools are set to run at low angles because of the heavy cuts I make. Still learning, I just expiriement with geometries until I get what I am looking for.

I also want a diamond power hone, but I have been getting by with hand shaping and sharpening. To do really nice as cut engravings the gravers really need to be shaped perfectly and very sharp. If your going to dress the cuts in some way you can get away with more primitive edges. I regularly use my belt grinder to shape and sharpen. It works.

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I've never used a sharpening hone. I did use a jig and stones as described by James Meek in

The Art of Engraving when I first started out until I visited Leonard Francolini. He convinced me to hand shape by eye using a grinding wheel and stones. Perhaps it is necessary to use mechanical aids when starting out until you "grok" the geometry but I don't think it's a hard and fast deal. I can shape a new tool and keep them all sharp so quickly, I can't imagine going back to the mechanical aids.

 

Please see the thread - Tools and Technical > Gravers - started by Janel. I did a little tutorial there on how I shape my gravers. The basic idea can be used to make whatever shape you need. The main idea is to make a sweeping heel rather than a faceted one. I found out later that this is essentialy how the Japanese chisels(gravers) are also, except they start with forged squares rather than round rod. The sweeping heel is the same.

 

Useful shapes are those that will do what you want. Don't mean to sound flippant, but that's what it comes down to. Like wood carving the possibilities are so vast that it resolves to making the tools that will carve the shapes of your design.

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Oh yes, now I use rubberized abrasive wheels(Cratex or other) on the foredom for the final shaping and pre-polish, then final polish on synthetic ruby stones. The geometry is ultra important, the finish less so, depending on the finish you want in the cut(not always mirror). If I'm roughing something out, I'll quit after the cratex.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have made some tools for the GRAVERMAX. I don't even know what to call them. Some have worked and some not so well.Grin.

You folks do not have any idea, how much people like myself, appr. the comments and ideas that you put forth.

Thanks a bunch. First time I have checked back, since getting the graver.

 

Chuck

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  • 2 weeks later...

HELLO FOLKS: I have had a few problems with my air. I ended up buying another compressor. I had to put some more filters in line and have it up and running again. :D

I have made some tools and am starting to figure out what not to do. :)

I am making a little progress on the cowboy type engraving for spurs and buckles. Done a little carving on boxwood. It is going to take some time for any amount of progress. It is coming just slow.

 

Two of my grandsons are playing with it and doing some interesting things. It looks like the machine is a keeper :D

 

Thanks again.and GOD BLESS

 

Chuck

 

PS. I went back to the start of this topic and found where Patrick was telling about the 901. Sounds like Patrick is quite pleased with it. Most of my engraving will be in the western(read simple) spur/buckle type of work. With some wood carving thrown in. thanks cb.

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  • 6 months later...

Don, I ended up buying the GRS dual sharpener jig and after Rick Eaton show me how to sharpen with it in Reno life has been much easier "I like it" !! its very quick

 

I also talked to Steve Lindsay about what rotary tool he uses and he mention the NSK so now I need to choose electric or air powered.

 

GRS has been very helpful even sent me a couple small replacement parts for free! I was impressed.

 

Rik

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  • 1 month later...

Hello.--Back again asking for info.Grin.

 

I am on the virge of buying a Magna block from GRS. The hand piece I am looking at is the one they have listed as #901. It has a side hose connection, will go from light to heavy on the power.

 

Anybody familiar with this hand piece??

 

any input would be app.

 

Thanks--chuck

 

P.S. I went back to the start of this topic and read PATRICKS comments on the 901. Sounds like it will be allright. Most of my engraving will be simple stuff on western spurs/buckles, with some wood carving thrown in. Thanks--c.b.

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