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Layout method for metal


Patrick Hastings

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. I bought this brand pen a few years ago and discovered by accident a great way to do layout work on metal for myself. Pigma Pens I was looking for a finer tipped replacement for Sharpie permanent markers that I had been using. The lines from sharpie are not quite fine enough and the marks will rub off. Sometimes before I want them too, but not easily when I want them too. There is also an unfortunate Etching effect that can affect patination on copper alloys.

With the "Pigma graphic 1" or the "Pigma Micron" the two that I have used. I can free hand designs and there is time to easily correct mistakes and make adjustments as it takes time to dry. The fine points allow me to achieve a very fine detail so the lines are not overlapping. when the pattern is set I wave a torch over it. The ink cures instantly and i have a "permanent" mark that will last throughout the job, but does not etch the surface.

Its very useful for my particular way of doing things, your mileage may vary...

Patrick Hastings

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Thanks for the tip Patrick. I have been running into that very problem lately and scribing through layout die doesn't allow for correction. I use silver pencils, but they are soft and don't allow for fine lines. I am going to order a few of these and give them a try.

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I've tried layout dye, Chinese white, various pens, Scotch tape transfer and have settled on pencil

(.4mm mechanical) over a fine(Aluminum Oxide , 50 micron white) sandblasted surface. Being pencil it can be erased without disturbing surrounding area. Sandblasters are discussed elsewhere and are indispensible for this and other purposes as far as I'm concerned. This fine texture can be easily polished away with 400 grit paper, stones, etc.

post-4-1139854030.jpg

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