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Cicada-Walrus Tooth


Janel

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Blush! Thanks friends.

 

I forgot to write more about it. Tired then. I have not been back to make the final measurements yet, today was a doing day for the spouse and son.

 

The Cicada is 1.5 inches long, from walrus tooth. It is hard, but not as hard a mammoth tusk, antler or bone. It is a very nice material to use.

 

As I carved, the material was self polishing in places. Regardless, I tried to do the final scrapes with tools that were sharpened with a clean edge so no grooves remained. Sanding began with 400 grit wet/dry sandpaper, 600, 1000, 1500, 2000 in some places, sometimes wet. For the wings I tried using "Soft Scrub" liquid with a very slow revolution "1" on the NSK microgrinder, with a small felt wheel and then plexi scratch polish liquid with a little cotton wheel. These two steps smoothed out the panes between the veins, as well as the veins themselves. The plexi polish is a creamy liquid designed to remove the haze and minor scratches from plexi glas (my display case components). This polish is my end of the process gloss maker for amber and other really shiney materials after absolutely every scratch and dimple is taken care of. By then, I am REALLY ready to be done!

 

The material is a little translucent, it glows when light shines from behind. I wanted to add depth to that, so I used some old lemon oil, hoping that it might soak in a little and dry deep to enhance the depth of the translucency.

 

It is pretty small, but does feel good in the fingers. Thie himotoshi will make it a real netsuke, but is very small for that use. It could be on a single cord and worn around the neck. I do not try to direct the end use very much. Just hope for loving hands to keep pieces safe.

 

On to something new tomorrow! I hope!

 

Janel

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Thanks to you.

 

I thought about that while looking around the studio for oil, but our baby is a big fella now, and the baby oil is gone. Grampa's antique bottle of mineral oil, can't say how old it is, smelled like varinish and had almost been applied when the odor hit my nose! I knew that the house's selection of mineral oil was farther away than I wanted to go that late in the evening. If I went to the house, I would not have returned to finish things, so the old lemon oil was the choice. Funny how some decisions are made, though in the lineup the lemon oil was my first choice out of what we have on hand. I'll pick up some baby oil though and see how it works. I do like the scent of it.

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A treatment used for knife handles is to immerse the handle in mineral oil, baby oil, and place in a double boiler. Bring the water to a boil and it will raise the temp of the oil to a point where it penetrates deep into the ivory. This treatment helps to minized cracking and checking. The piece should be rubbed with mineral through out it's life.

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  • 1 month later...

:):D

 

Thanks again, Garrett. I am fond of Iwami school carvings, though I do not consciously think of following a style when I approach each subject.

 

For the non-netsuke folks, Iwami school carvings are known for portraying subjects from their isolated island, carved from materials indiginous to their locael. Their manner of style is naturalistic.

 

Janel

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