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Hi from Moldova!


Natasha

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Hello everyone!! I'm Natasha Popova, living in Moldova. It is the small country which situated between The Ukrain and Romania, not far from the Black Sea.

I use diffrent raws for my carvings, box-wood, mammoth and walrus tusk, cachalot tooth. My carvings are the fine sculptures, okimono and netsuke.

The new work is the ryusa style netsuke, called "Dragon and Lily", 2 inches across! I so wonder about your opinion! ;)

post-215-1144085359.jpg

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Guest DFogg

That is wonderful Natasha. I would love to see how you did all that pierced inside carving.

 

Could you post a link to your web site and more pictures of your work? Thanks for sharing.

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Thank You all one more! It is so wonderful to be between You all!

Dear Don, I so tired to do any photos inside, but it was unfortunately! :(

I have only these photos. My web-site is http://mcc.md/Dpopov/

I carved the loop for the cord which was opposite himotoshi. There was so much undercutting work, I thought I would be cried! ;) Janel knows this "funny" story!

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The inside carving of the ryusa netsuke was a remarkable accomplishment, in mammoth tusk! That is HARD material to carve. Then, try to imagine making the tools carve half an inch away or more, sideways, from the hole in which the tool is inserted. Arrrgggghh! Not for the timid carver or faint of heart.

 

I think that Natasha meant that this ryusa is the first and only one that she has carved. You will find many remarkable carvings by this talented woman on her web site.

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Thank You, Dick!

I have a question: is there a contemporary carver who has carved such ryusa netsuke with a lot of open-work? :unsure: When I began to carve it, I found not many such netsuke, they all were antique. I even visited the site of Sotheby and saw some of them. My collector, who ordered this ryusa style netsuke sent to some images, too. But I couldn't find a contemporary netsuke! :blink:

Maybe I search badly?

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Natasha,

It's just my opinion of course, but I think regarding contemporary ryusa manju netsuke it's a question of what the market wants.

From what I've seen in auction catalogs, kagamibuta and manju netsuke fetch much lower prices than katabori (carving in the round) figures and animals.

It's a shame, because the ruysa especially take quite a bit of skill and time, not to mention different tools. With kagamibuta, I like how one can create a 2-dimensional scene-almost paint a picture- and have a fuller story than is sometimes possible with a compact 3-D carving.

 

Tom and Janel- you've created a number of kagamibuta style ones...any thoughts about interest in them from contemporary collectors.

 

I too can't think of a contemporary ruysa netsuke...

 

Dick mentioned a while back that kagamibuta netsuke could be considered medals by collectors of that specialty. Could ryusa manju also be defined under the medal category?

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Sadly, ryusa and the other similar forms of netsuke, manju and kagamibuta are held somewhat in contempt by certain factions of the collecting world. Katabori(fully 3 dimensional) netsuke are thought by these folks to be somehow inherently superior. This attitude has exerted it's influence on the contemporary work being made so that these forms are not often made.

 

I commend you Natasha for ignoring this attitude to make such a superior ryusa! (good-on-yer smilie) :unsure:

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To Doug's question: "Tom and Janel - you've created a number of kagamibuta style ones...any thoughts about interest in them from contemporary collectors".

 

I've created a number of kagamibuta netsuke over the years, and only sold a few. There is a definite reluctance on the part of netsuke collectors to obtain manju types (manju, kagamibuta and ryusa styles). Collecting them often seems to be limited to beginning collectors since the prices are generally lower, with a few notable exceptions when a famous name comes available. I suspect the reasons behind these (at least kagamibuta netsuke) being less desirable is the perception that they were produced most often by out-of-work sword furniture makers once samurai swords became outlawed, and that a mechanical means (lathe) was obviously used in part of their manufacture. I found this perception even more pronounced among contemporary collectors, since they are a much smaller subset of the general collector market. Janel may have had better luck, since many of her clients aren't netsuke collectors, who would simply look at her work as desirable based on its' own merit and not through the colored glasses of a particular prejudice.

 

Natasha, your work is exquisite! I regularly stop by your web site to see what is new, and would like to welcome you to The Carving Path! I can't wait to hear how you went about hollowing the ryusa.

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To Doug's question:

Can anyone guess why I don't make real netsuke that follows the rules, these days? What ever shape was made and presented at the seven netsuke collector's conventions I have attended, only one netsuke-like piece and one ojime were sold. I learned to not depend on the netsuke collectors for supporting my work, though there was always appreciation expressed.

 

Those who do purchase my work do not need my carvings to function as netsuke, and as a consequence, I have not been trying to make real netsuke. I may try again to make real netsuke after my next show (August) and see what I might come up with for the next convention in January (I'll post dates in Events) of 2007.

 

I have not been good at following the netsuke carving rules of compact, sturdy and not delicate, WITH himotoshi. What my problem is covers a lot of territory, and whether it is a problem or an asset :unsure: is left up to another discussion. :blink:

 

Natasha's ryusa netsuke has the client's commitment and that is a good and secure way to explore the netsuke form. For me, it might be an expensive risk to take. Many thanks for the dedicated clients who enable us to go forward with our work!

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Doug, I think You are right! The market dictates everything. This ryusa netsuke was the order, my collector asked me about a carver who is carving the same netsuke. He ordered one more such netsuke. Probably the market needs such things now! :unsure:

I agree with You, Kagamibuta is very astonished! I don't think that Kagamibuta can be defined as the medal category. It is more relief, I mean the separated aspect of Art, which cannot be copied many times like the medals!

Tom, I've seen your Kagamibuta, they are amazing! Thank You for your nice words about my work!

How did I do hollowing the ryusa? I began with the drill, made many holes, but the drill made very rough veiw, then I use tools, whech were bought in the shop for the dentists. To do such thing, the first time, was very difficult, no special tools, I never saw such netsuke before, no images! So, I carved it intuitively!

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