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Old Frog, New Frog, Apple


Janel

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What a beautiful piece Janel. Seeing the progression, especially when it spans events that have changed us, makes me wonder if you have had to struggle to find the right mental space to work on it.

 

The way the ukibori responded is wonderful, it is as though the energy you put into the piece was just waiting for your return. Thank you.

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Thank you so much Don. Yes to struggle over the past many weeks. Yesterday I had intended to walk in the state park near our home and drove to the studio to pick up my camera. The walk was part of the plan to gain momentum, but the sun shining into the studio, and the longing to be back to work tipped the balance and I did not go for the walk. I sat until the sun was setting, beginning with a test piece of wood to sample the tool and to see how the wood responded. It worked, and I did the ukibori on the young frog. Today I will be able to walk in the sun, I am helping to harvest squash and pumpkins at an organic CSA just up the road from here.

 

I look forward to more time to focus in the studio. The hurdle now is to determine how to complete the piece, to color or not to color, to oil or to tint the oil treatment. There are other pieces of wood and other materials hopping up and down for attention in the studio, so I'll need to quite waffling with my decision. It is good to be a big step closer to my work.

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I was concerned about the ukibori on the old frog. I was called away in late July, and the rest of the summer was lost to things other than carving. Today I finally found the carving bench on this beautiful sunny afternoon. Today's work completed the ukibori for the piece. The little frog - from compressions to raising, the old frog (whose compressions were shaved and sanded in late July) sat for two months waiting for the hot water. I am pleased to report that the time away was not noticed by the compressed wood! (Wiping sweaty brow smiley!) Phew! It worked!

 

To see more photos click HERE.

 

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beautiful, beautiful frog. you are amazing. cooch

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(Blushing smiley) Thanks you guys. It is good to be back at it.

 

Jake, It works with boxwood. The technique is known as ukibori, and there is at least one topic on TCP with more information about it. If ukibori works with other woods, I have not tried it to be able to tell you about it. The fine grain, and hardness are a couple of the attributes of boxwood. The fibers of the wood need to be such that they won't all break when compressed. Now you have me curious about what else might work

 

I am now working on making the sockets for the four eyes, and am just beginning to saw the amber. Slow progress from now, with careful fitting...

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Arrrgh! The last wipe after polishing the fourth eye, disloged the bit of amber and it got lost! Hours of work, hours of searching. Where does a sand grain sized eye (~2mm) go to? Grrr. I've begun another one. It's a long journey!

 

I did have a couple of lines of defenses for trapping the errant beast, but it slipped past my senses. Tom (Sterling), you mentioned working in a shoebox. Do you care to give us an illustration? I am ready for better ideas than what I have come up with.

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Dear Janel,

I don´t know what to say, is terrible to loose something made with so much effort... I know because it happened to me with the paua (mother-of-pearl) eyes for the Koropepe or the Manaia... Maybe this pictures can help you. The purpouse of the drawer is to prevent things like that to happen, also a leather skirt is used under the working bench.

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Hope it helps :rolleyes:

Sebas

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Hi Janel,

 

I mentioned the shoebox for cutting a tiny piece of work free from a waste stick, which typically flies off into limbo when you hear the snap of the knife cutting through the glue joint. I just cut a part of the lid away, enough so I can get my hands, the work piece and a knife inside the box. The sides and lid cover a lot of the area the piece would fly out through.

 

As another thought, you could design a system for making eyes similar to glove boxes I've used in laboratories. It's a box with a clear lid or window in the top. Cut small opposing holes in the sides of a box, just large enough to get your hands and carving/polishing equipment inside. Do all the work inside, much less of a chance of the eye escaping out into the studio wilderness. There are inexpensive small sandblasting boxes like this, complete with rubber gloves, sold by Grizzly and maybe Harbor Freight.

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Thanks for the sympathy. An hour got to be feeing like too much time. I just hate loosing the piece, and on the absolutely last stroke!

 

Sebas, thank you for the photos of the work benches. Is that you in the last photo?

 

I tucked a fabric apron under my shirt and attached it to the front edge of the workbench, and had other sorts of things placed on the surface of the bench to capture errant bits. This one simply got away. It drives me nuts! Oh well, the next eye is in progress.

 

Tom, the capture box seems a bit extreme, and distances one from the work, but worth consideration after sinking hours into the item wished to be contained! I must hybridize ideas and see what will work.

 

Thanks all.

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Hi Janel,

Nop, that´s not me working, I´ll send a photo soon. But here is something homemade that I found in the net and can be done, as Tom said, a closed box but instead of gloves just the part that holds your wrist made with some stretching fabric... GOD I don´t know the name of it! Just an idea here. And look, there´s even a fan inside. :rolleyes:

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I hope that the sum of all these ideas make you create something to help you.

Sebas

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Sebas, that looks like a good sort of box when using the grinding tools on materials that are the sort that cause irritation to skin and lungs when dusts are produced. I'd like to drill a hole in the wall and blow that particulate laden air out doors, after it passes through a filter sack of some sort. I would not like to be that separated from doing the tiny eyes. My maginfiers need to be in close to the work. Some sort of basin, to protect from the sides and front... thinking now about what I might have on hand that would be comfortable to work with, and be easily flattened for storage.. thanks all for the good ideas.

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Hi Janel,

 

I can relate to little lost objects - when to stop looking and go onward? Doesn't it seem that just at the moment of departure you almost sense the little thing getting ready to fly but can't go back? I'd like to see some photos of the eyes before you inlay them if you could. Best wishes to the finishing of this remarkable work.

Magnus

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Last weekend I completed the piece. After much stressful consideration, I went ahead and used only oil. It was a poor choice, given the nature of this particular piece of boxwood. I had used the scraps of this particular piece of boxwood for other tests, but there was no result that hinted at anything displeasing. The sculptural qualities disappeared, and I shed many tears and wrung my hands for 24 hours. It was not enough to leave it that way, so I squared my shoulders and began to add shading with a single color of artist's oil paint. Phew! PHEW! I feel much better now.

 

Read about Will Dikel's # dimensional viewing in the Photography topic. I find that to be a fascinating technique, once I mastered the eye crossing challenge. One can move around the merged figures quite nicely once the two images are focused on while crossing the eyes. So, here goes: the following images were taken the night the piece was colored. It has dust specks, which have been gently brushed away after the paint surface was firm enough. The piece will dry/cure for a while, until it feels right, then I will brush/buff it gently to bring the surface to an appropriate sheen and feel.

 

Cross your eyes and find the merged image to see this piece in 3 D. Once you get the hang of it, it is a fun exercise, just a little outside of our usual experiences when viewing imagery.

 

 

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How are your eyes now? :) Has anyone figured out how to do it to see the 3 D phenomenon? I think that I will try photographing the piece with a dark background, to see if that helps the effect and visibility.

 

Now, on to the next piece! Hooorray!

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Hi Janel, Magnificent piece, it is beautiful. Thanks for sharing your work.

I get inspired by your work.

Thanks again and keep sharing with us , Ed

 

for the 3 d effect you must back away from your computer and then stare at your picture wtih your eyes starting to cross when you see 3 images check out the middle picture.

ED

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Hello Janel,

 

I was just wondering, how can anyone carve something, so beautiful, so delicate, on wood, ready to chip. I have been carving metal for some thirty years, and will start carving stones shortly, but I do not think I will never, ever try to carve on wood. The frog, the leaves, and the space emptied underneath without braking or chipping the delicate layer of the leaves... It's gorgeous. Thanks for sharing Janel!

 

And yes I saw it, It looks even better in 3D.

 

Best regards.

 

ekrem.

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The thought of everyone staring at the computer screen going crosseyed in the last several hours brings a smile and a chuckle to me. Thanks! :)

 

I took just a couple shots after oiling the piece, and the lighting did help a bit, but in lighting that was not display lighting, the details were struggling to be seen. The color was a strong change for me as well this time, from the oil that is.

 

Thank you all for your appreciative remarks and compliments. It is so encouraging to be able to share the work with you. Soon enough the piece will go away, and I will likely not have the opportunity to show it publicly. I miss that part of it, sharing it with others. I am sorry that we are unable to see and turn around in our hands, the works from all of us, sharing our comments and critiques. It is good to have TCP support community!

 

Hmmm, I wonder what is next?

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