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box wood - seasoning


magnus homestead

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:):huh: I just my first piece of boxwood! I got it from Gilmers - I'm fortunate enough to live close by there and can go in person ( that is an experience in itself - if you've never been there be prepared to be blown away by the variety of rare and exotic woods they have ) I chose a half log section from Turkey - Jim said they'd had it about a year- it is 5 inches by 3 inches by maybe 3 ft. long. I sawed a couple of sections off it - thought perhaps I'd blank out a figure I'm wanting to carve using a band saw and then let it sit around a while to see if any checking occurs - does this seem a good idea? It has some checking on one end where a branch terminated, and a long shallow split check down the split side into the heart but that doesn't go past the center. Took some tools to it as soon as I got it home and I can see why carvers like this stuff. Thought I might carve something simple like a violin say 3.5 cm. long to get used to it without wasting much. Cost 10.00 lb. as a select grade.

Any Ideas or comments would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

Magnus

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I've been to Gilmer once. It is beyond belief. Apparently Myles has 2 other warehouses similarly stocked.

 

I always leave wood around for a while before I use it, but you can rely on their information. I like to work with wood that I know has been seasoning for a long time. Whenever I make a large cut-off I seal the end with Sealtite 60. This is a product that I bought a gallon of 10 years ago and will never use up. I did a search and can't seem to find a source. I will do some more searching. Don has also made reference to a product used by pool-cue makers that seals the wood. We can search on this forum and find that.

 

With wood of questionable seasoning I would saw off a somewhat oversize piece and watch it for a few days and proceed with caution, while doing some sealing as I go, which I often do with wood even if I am familiar with it.

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i believe the pool cue product is called nelsonite. it is an end product "wood stabilizer" and has had good and bad reviews from many knife makers who have used it. the wood needs to be in a dry condition for it's use.

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  • 3 years later...

The Sealtite material is like the wax-resist that we use on the foot rings of pots prior to dipping them into the glaze vats. The liquid is an emulsified, water containing mixture that when dry leaves a layer of wax that repels moisture. Such a product could be purchased from ceramics or pottery suppliers in your city.

 

Janel

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