Jump to content

Some more pictures of my carving


Ekrem

Recommended Posts

Here again are some more pictures of my work. The seal carving is my first attempt, its still in progress. I will be appreciative if there are members in the form who have been carving seals or family coat of arms on rings etc. as seals, and will be willing to answer some of my questions which shall arise as I go along.

 

Best regards,

 

dagistanli

post-155-1157754375.jpg

post-155-1157754402.jpg

post-155-1157754427.jpg

post-155-1157754456.jpg

post-155-1157754483.jpg

post-155-1157754567.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beautiful, Dagistanli!

 

I especially like the first seal - and how it is a little locket kind of box/pendant. How about a description of how you are carving it. And the chain, very appropriate looking for the subject, as well as very attractive. I haven't seen one like that before. Did you make it or is it commercially available?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beautiful, Dagistanli!

 

I especially like the first seal - and how it is a little locket kind of box/pendant. How about a description of how you are carving it. And the chain, very appropriate looking for the subject, as well as very attractive. I haven't seen one like that before. Did you make it or is it commercially available?

 

 

Thank you tsterling. It's inspiring to see that you liked the box pendant. Actually I started out as a pill box, and then I thought if I could drill a hole through the handle of the catch, I could turn it into a pendant, that is how it became a pendant. I made that for my wife, and thought she could wear it as a pendant until she starts using pills :). Abdulhamit’s (one of the sultans of The Ottoman Empire) coat of arms, carved and enclosed in the ellipse border, is copied from a picture taken in a museum at Istanbul, all the rest are my design and making, except the chain. The chain is sold commercially, and it’s sold by the name “Arnavut Zinciri” which means “Albanian Chain”. It comes in different thicknesses, and sold by the gram in Istanbul.

 

I first made the box, and then carved the ornaments on both sides. I only used hand pushed gravers, which were mainly onglette, flat, and half round. Also, soon I will post another one, a key holder, which I made for my son with the same coat of arms carved on it, and see if you like that one too. I will start out another one soon, and take pictures as I go along with explanations if you and other members would be interested.

 

How nice it is to be a member of such a great group of people, all talented, sensitive and sophisticated. For me it’s more of a need to respect than the need to be respected! Just felt the need to pass my sincere feelings to every one here, thank you all and,

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem cifter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

beautiful work. all are wonderful, but i espcially love that ring :-) that tiny detail you carve is amazing. i am looking forward to see more of your work, very inspiring to me.

 

Thank you for the compliment stone cutter. To me it's much harder to carve stones. I've seen your carving "Portrait of a Lady" it looks beautiful. Usualy faces have more details and curvatures on them, and it's a file of a life life time to carve one of them. Where do you hold them while you carve?, and are you using a rotary flex shaft or is your carving motor stationary?

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The pillbox/pendant is beautiful. Now I'm wishing I could read Arabic. :(

 

Hello Doug,

 

Thank you for your kind compliment. If I had your talent in sculpting and drawing I could probably have done it much better :) . I decided that after I saw both of your carvings in your home pages. I especially loved the one named "Snail and Chesnut".

 

The Ottoman scripture on the Pillbox pendant says "It's a rememberance to my sweet heart, my precious wife Munevver". My wife still hasn't been able to figure out what it says on the pendant :) she also can not read or write Ottoman hand writing. It's in Turkish, but written with a mixture of Arabic and Persian letters. We now read and write with Latin alphabet, so most of us can't read or write the old scriptures (you haven't lost anything :) . People who know Arabic may not really be able to read it, because it doesn't contain most of the signs that Arabic or the Persian letters have over/beneath them.

 

I will be over in Columbus on the 11th of October for 10 days this time, and will give you a call from there just to say hello.

 

 

Thanks again, and Best regards,

 

ekrem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was wondering about Ottoman/Turkish writing as I thought things have switched to a roman alphabet since Attaturk's time. I understand now that arabic script is still used for old-fashioned applications from time to time. :)

Thanks for your words about my work. I've been busy with other hobbies and distractions this summer, but got down to the carving bench over the weekend. I have to build up the calluses on my fingers all over again :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was wondering about Ottoman/Turkish writing as I thought things have switched to a roman alphabet since Attaturk's time. I understand now that arabic script is still used for old-fashioned applications from time to time. :)

Thanks for your words about my work. I've been busy with other hobbies and distractions this summer, but got down to the carving bench over the weekend. I have to build up the calluses on my fingers all over again :)

 

You are right about Ataturk, but he has changed the Ottoman script to Latin Alphabet, and that's what we are using now! I've learned to read only the late Ottoman books, which were written around 1928, from books all by myself, but I can't read or write Arabic cause it's completelly a different language.

 

Well, I can't wait to see what you are going to build up the calluses on your fingers on, over your carving bench :(

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here again are some more pictures of my work. The seal carving is my first attempt, its still in progress. I will be appreciative if there are members in the form who have been carving seals or family coat of arms on rings etc. as seals, and will be willing to answer some of my questions which shall arise as I go along.

 

Best regards,

 

dagistanli

 

Continuing to carve the crest, but I goofed up the top. I never realised how hard a negative carving could have been :)

 

Best regards.

 

ekrem

post-155-1158178420.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ekrem,

 

I am so very much enjoying your work - the pieces are beautiful - thank you for your compliments to my stone carving - it makes me feel very humble - I have never been able to carve or engrave in metal like you do. Isn't it marvelous to see so many loving expressions of the human spirit. I feel that the connections we make across the world through a site such as this is evidence of a flowering of the creative conciousness - thank you again for sharing with us.

Magnus :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ekrem,

 

I am so very much enjoying your work - the pieces are beautiful - thank you for your compliments to my stone carving - it makes me feel very humble - I have never been able to carve or engrave in metal like you do. Isn't it marvelous to see so many loving expressions of the human spirit. I feel that the connections we make across the world through a site such as this is evidence of a flowering of the creative conciousness - thank you again for sharing with us.

Magnus :)

 

Hello Magnus,

 

You are very kind. Thank you very much. You are absolutely right about the connections we make across the world, without any discrimination in any way, color, race, religion, nationality, one can name it... It absolutely is a great, and a comfortable feeling. I do share your feelings regarding the flowering of the creative conciousness, but there aren't very many sites such as TCP, and I realy do feel privilege to be a part of this elequent group of people.

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

QUOTE

Thank you for the compliment stone cutter. To me it's much harder to carve stones. I've seen your carving "Portrait of a Lady" it looks beautiful. Usualy faces have more details and curvatures on them, and it's a file of a life life time to carve one of them. Where do you hold them while you carve?, and are you using a rotary flex shaft or is your carving motor stationary?

 

 

sorry for late answer, ... no, i dont think carving stone as harder, but certainly it is different... i hold all pieces just in my fingers, this way is very flexible to move in correct position. i put my hand on something for support, to not shake though, and often i also put hand holding the carvingtool on something for stabilising ... i am using a flexible shaft machine, yes is rotating burrs.

 

thanks for sharing more work. i really enjoy looking it :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

QUOTE

Thank you for the compliment stone cutter. To me it's much harder to carve stones. I've seen your carving "Portrait of a Lady" it looks beautiful. Usualy faces have more details and curvatures on them, and it's a file of a life life time to carve one of them. Where do you hold them while you carve?, and are you using a rotary flex shaft or is your carving motor stationary?

sorry for late answer, ... no, i dont think carving stone as harder, but certainly it is different... i hold all pieces just in my fingers, this way is very flexible to move in correct position. i put my hand on something for support, to not shake though, and often i also put hand holding the carvingtool on something for stabilising ... i am using a flexible shaft machine, yes is rotating burrs.

 

thanks for sharing more work. i really enjoy looking it :-)

 

Thank you for the informative input stonecutter. While carving that golden ring "a bouquet of flowes" I had to hold it between my fingers and rest it on the bench peg. For me that was the best way to accomplish the job. You are right about the flexibility and functionality of hands while carving.

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Ekrem and all for contributing.

Lovely work Ekrem. (I'm glad we are using your name).

 

Thank you Jim. Your comments always mean a lot for me. As you know, I remain a humle admirer of your work.

 

I don't know if it's proper to ask this here in the forum or not, but would you suggest Lindsays airgraver for carving steel like, barrels of guns etc.? I think you mentioned some thing regarding that in one of your previous posts, if I remember it right. You could contact me off list if you like.

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ekrem,

 

what kind of pitch are you using to hold your work while engraving and chasing? the photo looks like it is a purple color. is it a local Turkish pitch or something imported? Dan

 

Hi DanM,

 

The pitch I use for that type of work is simply sticks of seal waxes (actually the color is red, but after you use it a while that's the color it turns to) melted over a circular wooden piece which is clenched between the claws of GRS BenchMate. If I work with thicker and heavier plates which require more strain on the metal, I use a home made pitch, in which I use a combination of shellac flakes and resin. More the resin, softer it gets. Some times only melted shellac serves the purpose, but you have to be carreful not to burn it while you melt it. If you melt shellac, please do it out doors, it really is a nasty stuff. Not good for lungs, and it smells horrible. Keep the wind behind you.

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

 

I don't know if it's proper to ask this here in the forum or not, but would you suggest Lindsays airgraver for carving steel like, barrels of guns etc.? I think you mentioned some thing regarding that in one of your previous posts, if I remember it right. You could contact me off list if you like.

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem.

 

Yes the Lindsay tools would be excellent for that type of work. You can see more about it HERE

 

and alsoHERE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ekrem,

 

i also use flake shellac on pieces of wood whole setting gemstones into jewelry. when engraving or chasing i use pitch from India which i have found more useful than the American pitches from the pacific northwest.for larger pieces i use a 6 inch pitch bowl that sits on a cheap swivel base . here is a photo with the last large project.

 

pitchbowl.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ekrem,

 

i also use flake shellac on pieces of wood whole setting gemstones into jewelry. when engraving or chasing i use pitch from India which i have found more useful than the American pitches from the pacific northwest.for larger pieces i use a 6 inch pitch bowl that sits on a cheap swivel base . here is a photo with the last large project.

 

pitchbowl.jpg

 

Hello Dan,

 

I've seen smaller versions of your work's pictures in your home page, they are all great, but the piercing work you've done on this one is my favorite, it looks wonderful. On bigger pieces, cutting with piercing saw, the hardest part of the game is to cut long straight lines, and having sharply defined corners where the curvitures meet one another, and as far as I can see from the picture it looks perfect in all aspects. First I would like to thank you for sharing it :). What are you planning to use it for? That tool, resting on the pitch beside the work piece, is it a burnisher of some sort? And just one more, how are you heating shellac to melt and pour on wood?

 

Sorry for too many questions.

 

Best regards,

 

ekrem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ekrem,

 

the celtic hell hound on the pitch was used in a piece entered in a contest sponsored by a knife collector. i will start a new thread on "The Way" entitled "Toast Cutter Contest" so as not to take away from your post and wonderful engraving. the tool on the pitch bowl is a # 0 onglette graver,i do a little hand engraving.

melting shellac on wood for holding pendants i use a mini torch to melt the shellac and then warm the metal for sticking it to the shellac. for larger projects i melt the pitch in a stainless pot that sits on an electric burner element.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dan, what qualities do you prefer in the Indian pitch and could you tell us where you get it? Thanks

 

Jim, the Indian pitch seems to be more versitle then others i have used. i am just a beginner compared to you and a friend/coworker who was trying to teach me. the Indian pitch was more resilant than other types of pitch,we could do fairly deep chasing on 24-26 guage copper without tearing and then use it in a vase like the photos you have posted without changing the hardness or softness of the pitch. red european usually seemed too hard and brittle,black pitch just never had the right consitancy.a close pitch is the medium from northwest pitch works. right now i don't have a source for the Indian pitch,but will try to contact my friend and see what he can come up with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...