Jump to content

Jade ravens


magnus homestead

Recommended Posts

:D I thought I'd like to share some photos of a pair of inlays I just finished for a custom wedding ring. They represent Odin's ravens who in Norse mythology would fly around the world each day and return with news of the day so to speak. Also they represent present mind and memory. They are carved out of black jade and I cut orange sapphires for the eyes. Size is about 11mmX8mm. Eyes are 1mm diameter. They will be set into white gold.

Magnus

post-239-1158821988.jpg

post-239-1158822016.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those are tiny! I do like considering the concept of the ravens for the rings, because talking and sharing is important between mates. They are wonderful little birds! How do you hold such tiny pieces of stone while you are carving and polishing them?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you Janel for the compliment. Yes I also like the symbol for wedding rings - the bride and groom put a lot of thought into this project. The jades weren't too difficult to hold as they are almost 1/2 inch long and 2 mm thick, but the eyes were difficult. I glued small faceted sapphires with epoxy to round toothpicks - table of stones to flattened pick. Then simply turned them against a flat dia wheel running in a flex shaft. I then flipped them over after they were the right diameter and glued them with the pavillion side into a cupped toothpick and rounded and polished the tops into a cabachon. Three unfinished stones are somewhere in my shop. Two out of five wasn't bad for the first attempt at such tiny eyes.

Magnus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:D I am laughing, since I also have several tiny amber eyes somewhere in the studio watching me from unknown places after flying off of the glue, or simply one bounce on the bench top and away it goes when fitting it into the socket. When the eye/amber is getting close to loosing it, I drape an old dishtowel across my lap and put a long edge on the bench, to make a sort of trap to catch the itty bitty things. It has trapped a few flying eyes or inlay pieces.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
:angry: I am laughing, since I also have several tiny amber eyes somewhere in the studio watching me from unknown places after flying off of the glue, or simply one bounce on the bench top and away it goes when fitting it into the socket. When the eye/amber is getting close to loosing it, I drape an old dishtowel across my lap and put a long edge on the bench, to make a sort of trap to catch the itty bitty things. It has trapped a few flying eyes or inlay pieces.

 

 

Funny you should mention that trick.

 

When I still in high school learning jewelry “lost wax” investment casting, I did an apprenticeship for a watch repair and jeweler. He taught me some of the techniques in watch repair and in jewelry design and fabrication. One of the tricks he taught me to avoid losing small parts while sitting and working at the bench was to tack the lower edge of my shop apron to the edge of the table. The apron then formed a “hammock” type catch-all with the ends being supported between my neck and the table edge.

I also used this method while Fly tying and reloading small cartridges. It will catch tiny hooks before they get lost in the carpet and I find them with my bare feet. Just remember to “detach” yourself from the apron or the table or you will get a big surprise. Take that advice from someone who found this out the hard way.

( “Wow this watch turned out great, let me get up (turning rapidly as I stand) and go to the buffer station and polish the case a bit……..YEOW!!" Crash!…Bang!…I garrote myself as every small part and tool on the table hurl themselves to the 4 corners of the earth!)

 

Take care

Link to comment
Share on other sites

nope- no cloth

If people could see the mess I work in the middle of! I've lost my share of pieces. Most recently, it was the eye of a weasel I'm working on. Trying a new technique that doesn't rely on the peg method. Darned thing shot out from my tweezers. Fortunately, I heard where it landed (on a piece of paper) and only had to search about a couple of square feet of carpet. Found it.

Now it's here:

 

post-10-1161196544.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks- yeah, the head still needs some shaping for a weasely look. The nose/snout is a little too big. It's boxwood. Things are at the end of the carving stage and into the scraping/smoothing stage.

 

 

Ah yes- the elusive (to me) box wood. I am going back down to my local Woodcraft’s store and check out their stock again.

 

I might have a source for holly wood as a back up if that fails. Where I used to live in Southern New Jersey, there is a town called Millville. They call themselves the “Holly City” with bushes and trees of the stuff everywhere. In lots, fields and the woods. People dig them out and burn them as they are like weeds. Of course, as luck would have it, now that I can find a use this wood, I live 600 miles away in Tennessee! :)

 

My Daughter still lives in Atlantic City with the Grand kids. Maybe a family visit, along with a folding saw, might be in order soon. ;)

 

Take care.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...