Jump to content

Inlay tutorial


Jim Kelso

Recommended Posts

  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...

I haven't been here in a while, and spent some time just looking around. I am humbled and amazed by the work I see here! Thank you for the tutorial on inlay. Your pictures are very clear, and your craftsmanship is an inspiration. I've downloaded the pictures for further inspection, and to remind me that my engraving and chasing are more than a way to earn a living. I am inspired to a higher level, art is calling.

 

goldcutter

 

post-2-1174365619.jpg

 

post-2-1174365663.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Goldcutter, thanks very much for your comments. I'm glad you find it useful.

Very nice sculpting on the ring.

 

Mark, here is a close-up of the trees although I don't think, because of the flat light, there is much revealed.

The middle tree has some relief. The other two flush with the surface. I'll see if I can find another photo that may show this better.

post-4-1174396460.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks Jim, the photo showed what I wanted to see. I am always looking for new ways to approach things. This technique is similar to how tombstones are carved, simple but effective. I do appreciate the detail and depth you achieved. Thanks for not only showing the work but the process as well. Great piece!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim,

Thank you once again for your generous sharing of both your wonderful works and your knowledge. I wish I had more time to just explore all the nooks and crannies of this site. I just went through your inlay tutorial and the patination as well. I was given an answer to a problem I've struggled with for years - that of obtaining a truly even and polished surface (especially on flat recesses). I have tried using scrapers, burnishers and tiny sandpaper sticks but have never come across the die makers stones you refer to. I have known that was what I needed but didn't know where or what to ask for. It seems most jewelers are not needing such finishing. Also the horsehair brushes - Beautiful - Thank you.

This site is a constant source of inspiration and the knowledge needed for me to reach out for higher levels of craftmanship. I am deeply touched.

Blessings,

Magnus

P.S.

I must add that every time I see your peony vessel Jim, I am much moved - lovely work!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jim, I love your work. The Owl is great. I use a technique on woodcarvings that may aid you here. When I carve a low relief tree and want it to stand out I put a slight bevel on the edge I want to highlight. It reflects light and makes it look like the last frame in your tutorial. If you will look at it you will see a highlight. A beveled edge makes it stand our even more.

 

Don

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've done up a tutorial on the inlay of the silver owl as seen earlier in the "metal painting" thread posted in new work.

 

You can see the tutorial HERE

 

Any comments or questions are welcome here.

 

Hi Jim,

I really like the color of the backround plate. What is the composition of the shibuichi?

Regards,

Patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello again,

 

Magnus, thanks very much for your comments. The use of stones is something not well understood. At some point I will do a more detailed summary of what I use.

 

Thanks Don. As you will see in the photo below, that highlight comes from actual shaping of the tree, which is slightly raised above the background.

 

Hi Patrick. It's 70%copper/30%silver. ;)

 

Thanks all.

 

Another shot after all carving(except owl) and during the polishing.

post-4-1174998050.jpg

post-4-1174998220.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found a link to a class at Revere Academy next month. of course the timing and location doesn't do me much good,but maybe someone else is interested.

 

Zougan Inlay

 

That's not far away from me. Where was that class 8 years ago! Ford taught me most of what's offered in that course to me a couple years ago, but I am still tempted it never hurts to get as much exposure as you can to various teachers and there individual expressions of the craft.

Patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Jim,

I have been fleshing out my palette of alloys. Experimenting with the coloration, mechanical properties, and such. I have sheet stock containing from 75 to 2 percent silver so far some with gold and some without. I am not getting that kind of gray with any of them yet. I have darker and lighter versions so far. I am still working on different solution strengths and proportions of Roshuko to Tampan. Fun stuff.

Patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Hi Patrick,

 

you won't get any appreciable change in colour of these shibuichi alloys by varying the colouring solution ingredients. It's definitely far more reliable and practical to concentrate on the alloy compositions. One thing to watch though, is having the metal at liquidus for too long once all the metals have melted. If the mix is allowed to become too homogeneous the alloy will tend to yield a much deeper, (and duller, in my opinion ) colour. It will also lose the discrete nashiji grain structure.

 

Cheers, Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Patrick,

 

you won't get any appreciable change in colour of these shibuichi alloys by varying the colouring solution ingredients. It's definitely far more reliable and practical to concentrate on the alloy compositions. One thing to watch though, is having the metal at liquidus for too long once all the metals have melted. If the mix is allowed to become too homogeneous the alloy will tend to yield a much deeper, (and duller, in my opinion ) colour. It will also lose the discrete nashiji grain structure.

 

Cheers, Ford

 

Thanks Ford,

That saves me some Roshuko.

As you told me, I put the silver into the melt at the last possible moment. I am getting visible nashiji in most of the plates as a result.

Patrick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Jim,

I have been fleshing out my palette of alloys. Experimenting with the coloration, mechanical properties, and such. I have sheet stock containing from 75 to 2 percent silver so far some with gold and some without. I am not getting that kind of gray with any of them yet. I have darker and lighter versions so far. I am still working on different solution strengths and proportions of Roshuko to Tampan. Fun stuff.

Patrick

 

Hi Patrick,

 

I believe I used a ratio of 4gr rokusho to 3.5gr tampan(copper sulphate) which is the formula given on a chart I got from Tokyo Geidai for mid range shibuichi. Supposedly this chart was from Natsuo's writings. There are so many variables in the patination process, I try to keep everything as consistent as possible, so when something doesn't pan out, you might have a clue as to why. I agree with Ford that keeping the liquidus time to a minimum will yield the most interesting results. Using your imagination along these lines could yield some interesting unique effects. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Patrick,

 

you won't get any appreciable change in colour of these shibuichi alloys by varying the colouring solution ingredients. It's definitely far more reliable and practical to concentrate on the alloy compositions. One thing to watch though, is having the metal at liquidus for too long once all the metals have melted. If the mix is allowed to become too homogeneous the alloy will tend to yield a much deeper, (and duller, in my opinion ) colour. It will also lose the discrete nashiji grain structure.

 

Cheers, Ford

 

 

Ford

 

aloha

 

Karl Carvalho, a new member here. Could you please clarify your comment concerning nashiji? Are you refering to the alloy's ability to be made into grain, the as cast structure (which I understand is forged to change grain structure before rolling) or the ability of the final material (after rolling) to "take on" a particular texture?

I have read about nashiji in relation to laquered inro surfaces, but am wondering if terms apply to the alloys themselves. This applies to my immediate circumstances as I am currently undertaking the process of making a range of shibuichi alloys at the local arts center.

 

mahalo

Karl

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Hello Karl,

 

Nashiji in shibuichi is a particular macro, as opposed to microscopic, grain structure that is sometimes visible with the naked eye on the surface of polished and patinated shibuichi. It occurs when the silver content has not entirely diffused throughout the copper matrix to form a true alloy. The copper molecules at this stage are still discrete clusters which are more or less evenly distributed. Think of raisins in a cake ;) or think of the silver as mortar between the clumps of copper. When the alloy is finished "correctly" (?) it appears that the metal has a graininess to it. It is similar to the lacquer effect, just a bit finer. Nashi; are Japanese pears and they have a grainy patterning on the skin, Ji; means ground or surface.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nashiji in shibuichi is a particular macro, as opposed to microscopic, grain structure that is sometimes visible with the naked eye on the surface of polished and patinated shibuichi.

 

So does this mean that the shibuichi I made the other weekend (25%) that I've been rolling out & concerned about the copper flecks just visible on the surface actually *should* look like that? I was assuming I'd have to remelt it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ford hallam

Hello Peter,

 

hard to say without seeing the piece in question but if you are annealing ( and make sure you let it air cool slowly!) and then pickling the piece to clean off the oxide you will be slowly depleting the surface of the copper. It's the copper oxide that makes up the scale. Repeatedly stripping the oxide off will leave the surface silver rich. You may be seeing flecks of copper that have now been redeposited on the plate. In any event the final surface must be ground or polished back to that pale pink colour. . You won't see any grain structure until you've polished it to quite a fine finish, and not by machine, and then patinated using the traditional solution.

I'll post a photo of the grain a little later today.

 

Of course it may be that your alloy is not mixed well enough, it's all a bit of a trick really. A bit like cooking. :D

 

cheers, Ford

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...