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How do you hold a small piece to work on it?


Dick Kahle

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I know that we had some input on this topic a while back. I'll see where it might be. Please, new members chime in with your own experiences here! I'd like to know what you use, too.

 

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Here is the link to one topic: CLICK HERE

 

There may be references elsewhere as well. Hope this helps.

 

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Here is what I use:

 

wbt2.jpg horiz_jj_carvingt2.jpg

 

The white stuff on the carving peg is referred to in the above linked topic.

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From Koryuen~ Netsuke Carving. Koryuen web site was created and is maintained by Komada Makiko, the daughter of Komada Ryushi a contemporary Japanese netsuke-shi and past president of the Japanese International Netsuke Carvers' Association. The photo shows Ryushi holding a carving and a tool:

 

sKnife16.jpg

 

The tool is gripped somewhat like a pencil and is braced against the other hand's thumb, which is used as a fulcrum. The middle finger of the tool hand is placed on the other side of the tool from the fulcrum thumb. That connection steadys the hands while the right hand aims, places and moves the cutting end of the tool against the carving. Rocking-scraping motions basically. (Since I was not present to watch the whole process, I do not know what other tools uses might be used in the course of carving a netsuke.)

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An eagle claw grip is generally not needed for the miniature work we all do. It probably goes without saying, but the sharper the tool, the looser you need to grip the item. Obviously there are some tasks where you need both hands free (punch work, certain drilling occasions...)- that's where the ticky-tacky white stuff or a vise comes in handy, or need to brace the item against a hard, resistant surface (sawing, filing, etc)

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  • 1 year later...

I am new to this blog but when I looked at the different carvers holding the small item in their bare hands I was very supprised. I always use a kevlar glove with a leather face to hold the item. The gloves I am talking about can be found on MY web site since I started out selling tools by selling gloves. The web site is http://www.thecarvinggloveguy.com I this site you can see two size gloves which are both LH and RH. At the very least wearing a glove gives you some chance of not cutting your hand.

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Here is the link to one topic: CLICK HERE

 

 

url got mangled somehow the repair would be

http://www.thecarvingpath.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=84

somehow &hl=hold got tacked on and bumps you out of the forum to one of those placeholders

 

how I hold something down varies with the object, from a tack weld, hot glue, wax, pitch, partially wrapped with a vise, drill a hole and tap from behind and add a mounting\holding plate, carve a protective wood jig to use in a vise, or freehand with no mount

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Thank you Chuck for catching that problem link. There may be a few more of those throughout the forum. In January 2007, there was a problem with the renewal of the .com version of the forum domain name, and it was switched to .net. I have fixed that original link so that it will go to the right page. Thank you again for catching it.

 

Hi Don, I like to be bare handed when doing the detail carving, which is the majority of the carving that I do. The first day when roughing out the piece, I wear a glove, because the rotary tool catches and circumvents the piece, over my fingers and fingernails on occasion. Gloves are mandatory for that part of my work. With what I do, the wood is so hard, and rounded, that it becomes slippery, and leather when the suede is worn off, becomes slippery also. I have many times encouraged the members to cut away from their flesh, (though I have not said that for a while).

 

Janel

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your welcome Janel, I'll keep an eye out for any others and just PM you ;)

 

 

luckily rotary burs don't make very deep holes :huh:

Ive got a bit of a divot in my wrist from a full sized die grinder that caught, whipped over the piece, then climbed up and mangled my glove :P

Not as bad as a when a harddisk or sanding pad catches or explodes off an angle grinder. (sent our lead smith to hospital last month)

 

I recut these fireplace bosses freehand on Friday, gloves are mandatory for tools with that much rotational energy. (click to enlarge)

(and a thick welding jacket isnt a bad idea either, would have saved our lead a trip)

2qxayq8.gif

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Guest Clive
I am new to this blog but when I looked at the different carvers holding the small item in their bare hands I was very supprised. I always use a kevlar glove with a leather face to hold the item. The gloves I am talking about can be found on MY web site since I started out selling tools by selling gloves. The web site is http://www.thecarvinggloveguy.com I this site you can see two size gloves which are both LH and RH. At the very least wearing a glove gives you some chance of not cutting your hand.

 

Don.. would it surprise you to learn that it is a lack of basic carving technique that necessitates your use of said glove?

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Guest Clive
According to whom?

 

According to what?

 

The universal laws of cause and effect!!

 

One cuts oneself because one loses control over ones tool. Basic carving tecnique is essentially about the means by which we gain control over our tools so that we can (at the very least) use them without causing injury. ;)

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Guest Clive
Ah yes- but we don't wear a seatbelt because we've failed the driver's exam.

 

Wearing seatbelts wouldn't be half as important if more people with driving licenses could actually drive!!

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Guest Clive

There is a good example of poor tecnique.... its only a matter of time before the poor fellow drives that tool deep into this left hand.

 

Edit... picture removed by request.

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It's when good technique runs smack dab into a pressing deadline, a tired artisan, stir in power tools, an object too large and heavy to get an ideal light or angle of attack on, and you have a recipe that calls for precautions.

 

Ive never lacerated myself with a chisel or hand cutting tool, but as Janel pointed out, its hard to weigh all the variables that may create a little too much bite on a bur or anything else with that much kinetic energy. Things that you think are secure, suddenly arent, a spark bounces off a table to land on a sensitive spot you flinch, you fail to accurately gage how tight a space is and the tool catches on the far side, its the end of 5 straight 12 hour days and it all has to be installed 90 miles away by tomorrow.

 

In the real world prudent precautions pay big dividends, because $#$@ happens :P

 

(of course systemic poor technique leads to early retirement :P )

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the use of gloves is not necessary when you don't care about your hands. I have seen more than enough examples of people cutting themselves that have been using gloves all night then remove there gloves and O I just need to make one more cut, only to end up slipping off the piece or having the wood give way and having terrible cuts. I do not like to see my own blood nor that of other friends.

So, it is your choice. You can do either. I like the gloves and feel safe. Others say they never cut themselves. Good Luck..

 

the gloves are $15

Cheep insurance

Don

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