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Boxwood stain


Doug Sanders

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I was looking through the products on offer from Dick Gmbh, the German woodworking supplier

 

http://www.dick.biz/cgi-bin/dick.storefron...f33609058f/Home

 

over lunch today and saw a product they call Boxwood Stain #427

 

The product number is 451370.

It is claimed that the stain reproduces the effects of acid darkening treatments on boxwood (see TCP thread on nitric acid coloring) and is useful for retouching and restoration work.

 

Has anyone tried this product?

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  • 2 weeks later...
I was looking through the products on offer from Dick Gmbh, the German woodworking supplier

 

http://www.dick.biz/cgi-bin/dick.storefron...f33609058f/Home

 

over lunch today and saw a product they call Boxwood Stain #427

 

The product number is 451370.

It is claimed that the stain reproduces the effects of acid darkening treatments on boxwood (see TCP thread on nitric acid coloring) and is useful for retouching and restoration work.

 

Has anyone tried this product?

 

Hi Doug,

 

No I haven't, and nor can I see it in my recent Dick Gmbh brochure, but it sounds very interesting and I may well buy some because their products tend to be excellent. If I do I'll let you know.

 

On the subject of colouration, I have recently stumbled on the late Guy Shaw's website, and am very impressed with his use of stains. Any ideas as to what he used?

 

Jon

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SEARCH function: Guy Shaw ... reveals some links, for example:

 

Guy Shaw - staining ivory: from Ford Hallam

 

And this link.

 

The SEARCH function helps find things with the right selection of key words (hint :angry: ).

 

Hi Janel,

 

Many thanks for these links - most informative :) . I just find the depth of colour and the translucency he achieves, in seemingly every material he touched, outstanding. As Doug said, his carving was truly astonishing too!

 

Jon

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I was looking through the products on offer from Dick Gmbh, the German woodworking supplier

 

http://www.dick.biz/cgi-bin/dick.storefron...f33609058f/Home

 

over lunch today and saw a product they call Boxwood Stain #427

 

The product number is 451370.

It is claimed that the stain reproduces the effects of acid darkening treatments on boxwood (see TCP thread on nitric acid coloring) and is useful for retouching and restoration work.

 

Has anyone tried this product?

 

Hi Doug,

 

I have now bought and tried this product and yes, it does produce a golden brown/red colour with excellent transparency (as you would expect from a water stain). However, to my eye the wood has a stained appearance about it which is a feature of some stains that I cannot help but associate with cheap production techniques. It's hard to explain, but in my view most of the typical wood stains available produce results that just aren't any thing like what they claim on the tin! In other words, to my mind, if you want the thing to look like, say, American cherry, then make it from American cherry, because nothing else comes close.

 

I appreciate that in this context we are after a colour that is usually the result of acid application and not a natural wood colour, but I would conclude by saying that 100ml of this stuff is only 6 Euro's, (and they kindly charged me half price for postage) so buy some and experiment because the colour itself is not displeasing.

 

I don't know if you got beyond the product description itself on their website, but if you didn't, just to warn you, you will find that a message comes up stating that it is only for sale to professional musical instrument makers, who must furnish them with the relevant proof via fax. Just email them to say that you work in boxwood commercially and you should be fine :) . Robert Hammerschmid was my contact.

 

Jon

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Thanks Jon. I just received the Dick Gmbh catalog in the mail today so your message couldn't have been more timely. I know exactly what you mean about the wood color being remiscent of cheap production items. I never understood why people would want to make poplar the color of oak, e.g. I guess it's because people need a color reference when they're buying the stuff. If all the packages said 'Brown' or 'light Brown' or 'sort of darkish brown' :) no one would by it.

Coincidentally, yesterday I acid stained a carving I'm working on and it came out just the right orange-brown color I wanted. I'll be posting a photo shortly and we can compare it to the results from the stain.

 

-Doug

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Oh goodie! Rubbing hands together smiley... I look forward to the images. Now, what exactly is an acid stain? Have we already discussed this in another topic? Want to elaborate here or in it's own topic? ( though you may keep secrets if you wish :) )

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Thank you Sebas,

 

You helped me with finding what I was hoping for (and saved me much time :) ). The Example on Ko's site is very helpful. He has managed to get a result which is very nice looking.

 

I wonder if there are any more detailed instructions for use of nitric acid, such as how much for how big a space, and necessary safety in handling and breating cautions we should know before using the acid?

 

I do like the dark and light contrasts of this technique. Thanks Ko Baas, if you are lurking here.

 

Janel

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Hello everyone, this is how I use nitric acid. It is 52% and I use it undiluted. I took a plastic bucket about 25 cm high and made a wire in it for hanging the netsuke on. The wire has to be stainless steel or something that's not reacting with the acid. I place the netsuke on a hook (piece of wire) in the centre of the bucket. I poor about 20 ml acid on the bottom of the bucket and cover it with a plastic bag secured with a elastic band. Then I leave it for 18 to 24 hours. It has turned in a dark yellow. The acid fumes have also softened the wood. But after colouring with Dylon and drying the wood regaines its original hardness. I add some soda in the dylon for neutralisation of the acid.

Always wear rubber gloves, and avoid breathing the fumes.

 

post-142-1161794022.jpg post-142-1161794042.jpg

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