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Hello From Tennessee


Joe Aimetti

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Hello all-

 

Looks like after a few glitches, I am finally in the system and can post. I just wanted to introduce myself as a new member to the forum.

 

I am almost 53 years old and I have been involved in some kind of Art related endeavor just about all my life. I started drawing, painting, then went 3-D to clay. About that time I was old enough to use some tools, found out real quick how sharp a dry wall razor knife can be when trying to whittle down a toothpick ( I was 8 0r 9 and cannot remember why I wanted to whittle a tooth pick , unless I was already thinking miniature..) I still have the scar on my left hand for that one. I learned how to use knives well enough to cut more wood than my hand and started an off and on life long experience with wood carving.

I have always been fascinated with small works of art. My grandmother's cameo necklace was amazing to me and i have tried to duplicate it in several mediums. I bought my first Dremmel tool at 11 and have never been without them ( I own 4 now). I enjoy making things myself like knives, simple tools and such. I find that the skills I learn in one hobby have a use in another.

I am attempting wooden model boat construction at present and building a schooner called the Bluenose 2. I want to decorate it with small carvings, which brings me to this site. I would like to hone my skills in carving or modeling very small to accomplish this decorating feat. I would also like to continue in small carvings even after the boat is completed.

 

Take care

 

Joe Aimetti

Kingsport, TN

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Welcome Joe. Please let us see the ship carvings when you get there.

 

Hi Jim-

 

I am currently in the process of applying the second layer of hull planking. I will not be adding details until I finish that and drill holes for the masts. This is a ‘Plank on bulkhead” or “POB” type model and allows me to gain experience in layering very small scale planks of wood over a shaped frame similar to how a real boat might be built. Since this is my first attempt at this kind of modeling, I am learning as I go, but have had a lot of help from a couple of people in some excellent forums. The pictures they post on their completed ships are amazing and encourage me to higher standards in my own project.

While this kit has very nice detail, I want to go one step further and really make it unique. I will “hack” this standard kit and make it a customized boat as if it belonged to a private owner that wanted to live on it and show it off as a floating work of art. It is a large undertaking, but not impossible. Some modelers have taken as long as 2 or 4 years to finish even a moderately detailed Sailing Galleon and some a lot longer. I do not plan on getting that involved, but due to time constraints with my job, I can only work on my hobbies a couple of hours a week, if that long. I will be eligible to retire in 14 months and finally be able to spend the time on my hobbies; which include carving. The photos of the carvings shown on this forum are nothing short of incredible and provide me with inspiration to create some pieces of my own.

I would like to express my gratitude to the forum members who selflessly provide guidance and support in sharing many ideas, tips and techniques learned through long hours of dedicated work.

 

 

Take care

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Your project sounds like it is quite time involved. What sort of tools are you using? What kinds of woods are you using?

 

This is a link to someone I met a while back, who carefully builds beautiful scale models of ships: CLICK HERE I created this web page a while ago, and did not link to it from my main web site, just to share with folks who would appreciate this fellow's work. The little train cars are his as well.

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Your project sounds like it is quite time involved. What sort of tools are you using? What kinds of woods are you using?

 

This is a link to someone I met a while back, who carefully builds beautiful scale models of ships: CLICK HERE I created this web page a while ago, and did not link to it from my main web site, just to share with folks who would appreciate this fellow's work. The little train cars are his as well.

 

Hello again Janel-

 

The woods came with the kit from a company called “Artesania Latina” (from Spain I believe) and included some Mahogany, Pine and another dense, dark wood for the keel. Most of the pieces have to be final shaped by hand to fit properly and some more than others. As I am “hacking” this kit and modifying the appearance from the stock design, I have picked up some basswood, oak and several different veneers’s to make the look my own style.

I did not have to pick up too many tools, just some specialized ones that help the process. I had most of the hand and power tools, knives, cutters, scrapers, saw’s and carving tools already. I will post pictures of them soon. I bought a holder that holds the boat by the keel and tilts around to allow me access while gluing on planks. Normally, you glue long plank strips on the hull and make score lines to indicate shorter, scale sized planks. I decided to be a glutton for punishment and individually cut each plank to size. This means I have to glue each and every one on separately. It is more time consuming and labor intensive, but I like the effect. I have completed one side and ¾ done with the other. Once I get the hull finished and drill the holes for the masts, I can add the deck and detail carving pieces without worrying about breaking them as the heavy handling work will be done.

Like I said before, what I am doing is minute compared to the works of Art that the guys on some of these web sites devoted to wooden ship building have done. The detail is nothing short of amazing. There is a 1200: 1 scale modeling method that some modelers work with. At this scale, a 500 foot long ship scales down to a couple of inches. The detail on that is also very impressive.

If you want a real humbling experience as to miniature modeling, do a web search for a guy named Willard Wigan and check out the work on his web page. He makes ships, among other things, that fit on the point of a pin. I did say the “point” not the head. The ship is “sailing “on a piece of crystal the size of a grain of salt. Not small enough? How about the San Francisco Bridge, INSIDE the eye of a needle! And he does this by hand with tools he makes himself. He says he carves between heartbeats so as not to move his hand and ruin the piece. And he is just one of several I have researched into.

 

I have taken enough bandwidth on this post.

Take care

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Donald McNarry

 

For me, McNarry's miniature ships remain the most impressive I've ever seen.

 

There are many doing superb work in this field today, but McNarry, now retired, is still the master. All the models on this page are rather large compared to what he was capable of. Even blown up to a huge size, photos of some of McNarry's waterline models under full sail, at less than four inches long, are utterly convincing. They look like real ships under real sailing conditions, not models.

 

All the more amazing if you have a copy of his "how to" book (published in 1955 and long OP). His tools and materials were of the simplest.

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Donald McNarry

 

For me, McNarry's miniature ships remain the most impressive I've ever seen.

 

There are many doing superb work in this field today, but McNarry, now retired, is still the master. All the models on this page are rather large compared to what he was capable of. Even blown up to a huge size, photos of some of McNarry's waterline models under full sail, at less than four inches long, are utterly convincing. They look like real ships under real sailing conditions, not models.

 

All the more amazing if you have a copy of his "how to" book (published in 1955 and long OP). His tools and materials were of the simplest.

 

Hello-

I went to that site. My goodness the works there are amazing. Even the water looks real. With all that fine work out there, I guess I will really have to work hard to make my model unique. Maybe I can use something I learned in electronics, my profession, to make it special. Ah! Working lights all around! Using tiny grain of wheat bulbs or LED’s. Of course I can make all the rigging, pulleys and such actually work.

Thanks for the link to the site.

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