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Photos with mini studio


Sebastián Urresti

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Hello Guys!

Here are some pictures of some pieces. As I read about the mini-studio I kept on thinking about a cheap cheap option, specially for those of us far from that kind of technology, and here are the results.

Hope you like it,

Sebas

PS: The cords are Maru-yatsu (four plait) made with a Maru-dai.

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Here are some pictures of the box

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What is the box constructed of and what lighting do you use? Digital or film camera? It is effective for taking photographs of pieces which lay flat.

 

Thank you for sharing the photos of your carvings with us. Jim used good words to describe them. I especially like the little toggle and loop at the ends of the cords.

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HI GUYS!

First of all, thanks for your words, coming from you they have another weight.

Well Janel, the structure is made from a Philips boling-jar sort of thing box that is 11 3/4"x 7"x 8 1/2" and I roughly cut the structure only to have a hard skeleton so this white paper is glued on, the paper is the one used for plans or technical drawing. If you want to take some shots of standing objects you need two layer of white paper in the back, following the curve, to achieve the infinite effect. You can see the curve in the box photograph. As for the light I used a 100W lamp for each side and a 75W on top. The camera is a simple digital one, an Olympus D-580 in a tripod. The lighting is difficult to handle but I am still learning and writting down everything. Here is another picture a little better, I think...

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The toggle and loop is used by Maoris to tie their pendants, simplicity is always effective. Here is a fast image of one, the braid is an 8 plait one called Yatsu-Se.

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Thanks for the questions,

Sebas

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Thanks for the description Sebas. Are the light bulbs the regular everyday bulbs, tungsten? Do you set the white balance to match the light source?

 

The leather background is too reflective for my taste. The simpler the better, as in what are you trying to call attention to, the background for its attractive texture and ambiance or the cord and toggle? The background should be used to enhance the piece being photographed rather than detract from. That concept works with the pendant image just above the toggle image, and the darker background pops the pendant and its cords, rather than blends in with them as in your first photos.

 

I apologize for making this a lesson, but we are all students, some with more experience to share.

 

Is the cordage kumihimo, made with a kumihimo frame and bobbins? Are you willing to share some information about how you make the cords and what material you use for the fibers?

 

And, short term memory fails me sometimes, what is the material you are carving for the pendant and toggles?

 

Janel

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Dear Janel:

Don´t apologize I am learning from people with more experience as you and when I write a message I´m waiting for an answer, comment or something to keep on learning from, in order to improve my work and its result.

The light source is made from common lamps. In this camera I don´t know how to balance the white or even how to measure it. I think that the camera does it automatically, as long as I think I know... Not sure about that...

Yes, the cordage is made with a Maru-dai, the round stool used for braiding, with 4, 6 or 8 bobbins that are called tama. I braid the waxed nylon fibre that is used to sew leather that comes as a three-ply cord.

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Once unravelled I put around a tama and start the braiding process. With more tama more complex patterns can be made, 4 tama are the basic and very base of Kumihimo with a braid called Maru-yatsu made in two movements: one clockwise and other anti-clockwise.

post-318-1160099401.jpg Cord and three tama

The pendants are made of bone as the toggles. They are not round but flat with diferent shapes and, sometimes, not centered as shown in the photograph.

I will prepare a tutorial on how the braids that I use are made with some pictures to make it better and clear.

I hope that I have answer all your questions,

Sebas

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Hi Andrew!

I think that the ONLY place where you can get that information from the SOURCE is right here:

Bone Carving: Stephen Myhre ~ A skill base of techniques and concepts.

And the best of all is that you can buy it right here in the Path!!!!!! :rolleyes:

Do you carve bone? Why don´t you go on the Who´s who and let us all know something about you...? :D

Thank you,

Sebas

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Dear Andrew:

Don´t worry about that review, is a lie. I am from Argentina and here the only Maori things that we know are the All Blacks and the Kama Te Haka... Think about information on bone carving! None. So the only way was to buy a book overseas from none other country than New Zealand! The other side of the world from us!:) But I took the risk and I am completely happy. Believe me, is the best book for that kind of information, but I know that another one is out of print from a carver named Ropata Davis, is called Treasured Taonga, if you know about that one PLEASE let me know.

If you can take a look at the book, do it, but if you can´t just buy it!

Trust me, you will never regret it. :angry:

Sebas

I hope that you understand my Argentinian English...

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Hi Andrew,

If you go to any public library in NZ they will have a copy of Stephens book or be able to get you a copy. It was the book that got me started in bone carving. It has some very good step by step guides. The best part is the lashing and braiding which Andrew has followed well.

The libraries usually carry a few other bone carving books as well as some excellent pounamu or jade carving books. Look in the Maori arts section for heaps of other inspirational books.

 

Cheers Rex

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I am a fan also. The tools were the hit with me. The concept of the three sided tool, with two flat planes and the third making an arch at the end, has been an indespensible concept for varying diameters of tool stock, from 1/16" to 3/8" so far. The history of the shape of the tool is quite interesting as well.

 

You might find more folks in the "go ahead and get the book" camp, because many of us have it and appreciate it. Stephen Myhre (the author of the book we are discussing) is a member of this forum, but is a quiet one.

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That is all I needed to hear. It is being ordered at the moment.

 

Rex I would love to be able to pop back into an NZ library. Unfortunately, I am back in California. I'll head back soon though.

Sebas, your english is perfectly clear.

 

Thanks for the feedback everyone.

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  • 5 years later...

Hi all,

 

I have waited a month and a half for the book from Amazon..... They say it's hard to get.

 

If anyone knows another way to get a hold of it PLEASE let me know.

 

Soon as it does arrive I will give a review from a newbie

 

Pete

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Holà Sebas,

 

Thanks for posting. I have been thinking about a light box, but my lazyness won the battle...But now that I see the difference...well I will have to start seriously considering it. Especially when I see the difference concerning the Hei-Matau between the first and the second pictrue. The second one clearly give more credit to you work. ;)

Thanks again

 

Christophe

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hola Christophe!

Thank you for your comment and I am very glad to hear that you will consider to build a mini-studio to take better pictures of your carvings!

Totally agree, it gives more credit BUT it makes the errors more evident! :wacko: If you take a look at the Matau picture you will be able to see that the curve is not that smooth! :P

To be honest I did this with the intention of building a better one in the future but I was not able to manage my time to do so... :(

...and I am on THAT future now! :lol:

Please, go ahead and build one and make sure to take notes of the results of each picture as to have a "witness" of what was done and how the settings were on each one of them. I used a very simple and old Digital Camera but I tested it in order to adjust the white balance, light source as well as its position and took notes on every single change made to compare the results. I used a very simple and cheap tripod to make sure that the camera was steady and to ensure the eqaul distance on every shot. I hope that this information helps you and the rest of the superb carvers here to build one of this mini-studios!

As soon as you have an example, please, post it so we can take a look! ^_^

PS: I think that I am using a lot of emoticons lately... :blush:

Cheers!

Sebas

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Hey, Janel!

Thank you for your words! :D U R THE BEST!!!!!!

To be honest, I am always coming to the forum to see what is going on but as I am not carving lately I don´t have much to share... :(

What is really interesting is that I have seen a lot of bone carvers lately!!! :lol: Should we start a separate Guild or something here?! LOL!

I will try to gather some pictures of my latest works, put a filter on them, and make an entry on the New Work or Show & Tell section...

Hugs to all of our members!!!

Sebas

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Hi Sebas,

 

Thanks!

 

I look forward to seeing anything that you want to post! Are you still performing music?

 

Yes, I have thought about making a separate section for bone carvers, but have not taken the steps to do it. Sorry.

 

Janel

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  • 2 months later...

Dear Janel!

Sorry for the loooong delay but I was making an EP (small record) with my percussion group and making some shows, so YES! I am still a percussionist! :P

Well, now that I will have some more time, I will finally get the pictures and post them on the forum.

As regards as the bone section, I think that it may be a good option to have one! :D

See you soon, hopefully...

Hugs,

Sebas

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Hey Sebas!

 

It is good to see you here again! I look forward to seeing what you have been carving.

 

Are there any new youtube examples of your music? I recall long ago seeing something there. I am glad to know that you are also making music.

 

Janel

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