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Wood Inro


DanM

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Since i have nothing to go by except a few photos,i am slowy working on the inro. i am probably going in the wrong order of things,but i'll figure it out sooner or later. i have rough cut the male parts and will be working on the female sections as time permits.

 

inro019a.jpg

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Hi Dan,

 

What wood are you using? Yann Christophe sent a description of a deconstructed lacquered inro. Two interesting items were, actually three, the bottom of the lower bung pulled out, and to it is attached the liner paper and flange which extends up from the top of the bottom bung, and the inside of the bungs are lined with a paper which extends above the top of the wood bung and is then lacquered with the piece. The cord channels have rolled paper which is lacquered on the inside, inserted/glued into the cord channels. Will wonders never cease?! There is a photo in the most recent book by Alain Ducros. I don't know its title, sorry.

 

Now, I do not know if all inro are constructed this way, but it does explain the delicate nature of its parts, and why the flanges are intact after so many centuries of existance. The top edge of the flange from the lower bung meets the bottom edge of the next bung up inside that next bung, which also must have a bottom/top of _____? wood or lacquered paper?

 

I like the way your wood piece is looking. It is lovely so far.

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Hi Janel,

 

the wood is butternut wood from the scrap bin of the local wood carvers club.there is usually 2 large boxes of basswood and butternut scraps for the picking. i have been doing a little research on inros and find many were made of lacquered paper much like the English and French paper mache snuff boxes of the 17th and 18th century. we are able to access the statewide library system now which includes the universities.limk to library access,you just need a library card ,title or author to find thousands of books and videos.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

The inro is on hold till i get the Christmas rush orders finished and delivered. i have been doing a bit more research on the subject though.i recieved "the Japanese Inro" by Julia Hutt from the U of M library and it has a lot of history and some of the manufacture processes. one statement was the most expensive and desired inro' were made of leather,there are also refrences of wood veneer being used as the small tutorial i posted. there seems to be as many materials and techniques as there were craftsmen and cities in Japan.

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