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Dust Collectors


Janel

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Jim Kelso has mentioned using a dust handling system, I have perhaps mentioned one as well in past messages. I consider having some form of dust collection an important part of the studio where dust is made, whether by power tools or active sanding where very fine dust particles are produced.

 

What do you use? How does it handle the dust? Is it noisy? Is it convenient? How do you fit it into your work space? Are the filters washable or easy to find at the local hardware supply store? Was it simple to acquire and set up? Any other questions to ask and answer are welcomed...

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As mentioned elsewhere, I use the Handler 66 under the bench type collector. I've used it for years and am very happy with it. I bought a T fitting so I can run hoses to two separate work stations. They also sell a variety of work station trays, guards and accessories. It makes some noise, but I have it right on the floor next to me and don't find it unacceptable. You could put it in a cabinet to insulate the noise. Buy extra filters. I replace mine once a year or so.

 

They also sell a lot of other products worth looking at. I have one of their Red Wing bench top polishers; a beautiful machine.

 

Handler Mfg.

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Another question to add to my list of them: Does any system vent the air outside? Our vacuum systems in the house and studio do that, the clay dusts from the pottery are not easy to totally filter out... I have considered this option believing that all the wood dusts are not entirely trapped as well.

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I use a portable desktop dust collector. I'm not sure the brand name, but it says "DC720" on the front in big letters. I found a web site with a picture here.

 

It uses three computer fans and sucks air through a deep-pleated filter. I've replaced the filter once in six years of power carving. I usually just vacuum out the filter with my shop vac.

 

It handles the dust very well. I power carve in a room that also doubles as my office, so my computer is constantly breathing whatever is in the air. Even after a couple of years, my computer is still relatively dust-free on the inside.

 

It doesn't make a lot of noise, so you can stand to have it running and still manage to listen to the TV (I like to half-watch and listen to the TV while I carve).

 

My only complaint is the desktop where I carve is almost completely taken up by the dust collector and the plastic hood, and I don't have another area to work in. So I have to put the dust collector away (under the desk) when I need the space for something else.

 

All in all though, this is a good dust collector.

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That is what I have. When it is on high it is not quiet, but has a good draw. I found commercial filters of the correct dimensions and purchased several at at time at a low cost. I purchased a case of the recommended filters as well for high cost. Right now, the recommended green wirebacked filter goes in first, then a commercial one is taped into place to cause the suction to go through the two front filters. On the back of the machine I have taped another filter to trap any more fines that might have passed through the other two filters.

 

Each filter traps some material! That is why I think about venting the air outside. Then I could use one filter to catch the big stuff and poof the fines outdoors. A fresh air inlet might be necessary, like we have at the studio for the boiler which heats the hot water for the Wirsbo style heat in the floor system. That inlet is a double walled, plastic sheet, wire and insulated tube that enters about 36" up from the floor, it drops down and returns up to about the height of the inlet (taped together at this point. The loop traps the cold air like a water trap in plumbing. When air is demanded, the air is drawn in from outside, when the boiler is off, the air does not flow through the tube. Simple system. A smaller version in my studio room would be welcome for air exchange.

 

The outside air intake is a screened and shielded unit from the builder's stuff at a home builder's supply store. Can't say what it might be called...

 

I push my collector off to the left of my carving area with the plexi closed when not in use. I set it near the carving peg when in use. I am right handed and when using the NSK microgrinder, the debris shoots off to the left. I try to have some plexi between my eyes and the activity, but also wear glasses. Because of moderate hearing loss, I wear ear plugs while the fans are running and the drill is working at the beginning hours with a carving. I tune out everything but me and the carving. The days and weeks of hand tool use is without ear plugs.

 

A topic of its own- what we listen to while working! Once the carving has been established by blocking in, and the bulk of unnecessary material is gone, I listen to audio books. I can still get a sense of a book when I look at some carvings, years after they are done. That is a weird sensation when looking at someone's collection of my work (nice to have happen!) and the story pops into my head...

 

I have not been brave enough to put a computer in the room where I do my work at the studio that is for both my husband's pottery and my carving. Clay dust floats around as well and is attracted to many things. The other main reason is that if the computer were out there, I would not be able to separate my computer work from my carving time and all would be lost. Computer work is done when momming is necessary at the house. Our great son is past 13.5 years old now and we want to be a presence in his after school life, believing that he still needs guidance for years to come.

 

The portability of the dust collector is handy, I move it to the sawing bench when preparing materials with the vise and saws.

 

The FishCarver collector is interesting. I would not want to sit right next to the fan or the dust bag though. I'd rather install that part outdoors in a cupboard with vent in it to keep the noise down and the dust away from me. That is just me, but not what I have done.

 

Thank you both for the links and descriptions.

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  • 1 year later...
Jim Kelso has mentioned using a dust handling system, I have perhaps mentioned one as well in past messages.  I consider having some form of dust collection an important part of the studio where dust is made, whether by power tools or active sanding where very fine dust particles are produced.

 

What do you use?  How does it handle the dust?  Is it noisy?  Is it convenient?  How do you fit it into your work space?  Are the filters washable or easy to find at the local hardware supply store?  Was it simple to acquire and set up?  Any other questions to ask and answer are welcomed...

hello i'm going to order a dust Handler but what do you think about the SUPER SUCKER 62-II BY HANDLER DUST COLLECTOR thanks for all replys

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I had to build me a small dust collector I got a small fan

10"X10" for a filter I use the Paper filters for shopvacum. I keep my sanding down and go out side when I have a lot to do. My carving Space is just a walkin closet. When I had My Studio I had Dust collector something like this one

Penn State Ind

that I could move around, and connect flexable duct too. If you have space and can install a larger one outside with the bags on it that is the way to go.

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I had to build me a small dust collector I got a small fan

10"X10" for a filter I use the Paper filters for shopvacum. I keep my sanding down and go out side when I have a lot to do. My carving Space is just a walkin closet. When I had My Studio I had Dust collector  something like this one

  Penn State Ind

that I could move around, and connect flexable duct too. If you have space and can install a larger one outside with the bags on it that is the way to go.

went with the 66d handler thanks for your help

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  • 5 months later...

I use a bench top dust collector from Razertip Industries in Canada, the Razaire 530.

 

Razaire 530

 

This unit has several advantages over the DC720 (which is also widely used by bird carvers). For one thing, it's quieter. It's also much more compact and very efficient. Cam Irving, who owns the company, is a nice cat. Good service. Many bird carvers have replaced their DC720s with this unit.

 

I also run a JDS Air-Tech dust filtration unit for catching the really small stuff that stays in the air no matter how efficient a bench top collector may be. These things are big and heavy, but they do the job.

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  • 5 months later...

I also use the Razaire; I've got the optional lap tray, which I turned into a traditional down-draft style table. (a simple construction lumber frame with pegboard over the top). I do nearly all of my sanding over that table now, and the suction is strong enough to easily keep up with the material. Cam told me that he uses one to clean up after his surface planer. He runs the collection house through a cyclone lid (which fits onto a refuse container) and it keeps up with his 10-inch planer.

 

Bob Duncan

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  • 2 weeks later...

I use earplugs, the soft ones that compress and stick way into my ears. I can almost not hear the tool and motor when they are in far enough. Long periods of steady sound is harmful to the ears, as well as shorter very loud sounds (and extended very loud sounds). It is good to protect your ears from the sounds of the motors.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My wife is fond of reminding me that a blender on high for more than 30 seconds is enough to damage your hearing...so I use that as a benchmark for determining whether or not to wear hearing protection. Plus, my micro motor sounds unsettlingly similar to a dentist's drill!

 

Bob Duncan

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  • 1 month later...

I was in with my podiatrist today and noticed, in light of The Carving Path, that he uses a dremel like tool that has a built-in suction hose with dust collector. He said it is produced by a company JanL for about $1800 but that there were less expensive models too. The collets of podiatrist debriders generally are 3/32nds but can come with adjustable chucks too. Just a thought - combination rotary tool and dust collector in one.

 

Ralph :)

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post-152-1177294723.jpgHello All,

 

Great topic full of a lot of good info. Appreciated reviews on the Razaire by Musket and Bob Duncan. I just purchased a Razaire based their reviews. I was looking at the DC720 from Penn State Ind and also a similar model from Woodcraft. I'm happy with the purchase.

 

One additional feature of the Razaire is its size. The 8"X8" is high enough for an engravers block. I've attached a photo of my set up ( I think it is a small enough file for everyone to download quickly). Pardon the piece on the block which is a little larger than those done by Carving Path members.

 

Also, for do it yourselfers, the Spring 2007 issue of Carving Magazine has a brief article on building a portable dust collector. The author, John Call, has a home brewed dust collector with a vent to the outside.

 

Thanks again

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  • 2 months later...

Another alternative if you want to go cheap is to use an old Aircleaner with HEPA filter. These are designed to filter plant pollen out of the air if you are allergic so they should catch even the finest dust particles. I got mine for 5€ at a flea market/garage sale replaced the filter for a new one and voila! Rough grinding is done in front of the running shop vac with the Hepa running in the background ,when sanding and filing I move the unit to the workbench. On mid level I can still easily listen to music inthe background.

Downside is, it's big and takes a lot of space on the bench but this forces me to clean the always too cluttered workbench more often than I would do otherwise...:)

The unit I use is a DA-5010E Honeywell. Ther are smaller rectangular ones that would fit better but this is the one I got.

 

Ralph

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